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The Mind Of A Playwright Essay

815 words - 4 pages

Sophocles was one of the most influential people during his time period. He held important positions in offices, participated in around thirty contests, where he won around twenty-four and was never placed lower than second, and he also received the posthumous award of Dexion, or receiver, from the Athenians. However, much of his beliefs and ideals concerning various subjects can only be drawn out through his plays, as little else remains to tell us his beliefs. Antigone in particular reveals facts about Sophocles that shows an interesting light upon him. It, along with his other plays, shows an interesting take on his beliefs about the Greek gods and goddess, and his views on a single ...view middle of the document...

Sophocles, despite the fact that he does not show the same urgency in the Greek gods as his peers do, has shown that he does revere them and he makes that fairly clear in the main conflict of Antigone. Throughout the play, one of the main points he pushes is the idea of human morality vs. the power that the state holds. At one point, Antigone says that “Nor did I think that your edict has such force/that you, a mere mortal, could override the gods,/ the great unwritten, unshakable conditions.” (Sophocles 1483) He shows that he clearly believes that the gods’ decrees are far above what a man can say or rule, that is unlike to change, and that Creon should admit to his wrong doing. The blind prophet Tiresias tries to explain this to Creon, “All men make mistakes, it is only human. / But once the wrong is done, a man / can turn his back on folly, misfortune too.” (Sophocles 1497) Even in the end, when Creon finally realizes the error of what he has done, the gods continue to take from him for him even daring to try to override them.
However, while Sophocles does share the view of the morality vs. the power of the state, he has a far less optimistic view over his view on human destiny. Even when his...

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