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The Mockingbirds In Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird

737 words - 3 pages

The significance of the store To Kill a Mockingbird is the expression mocking bird appears in the story lots of times. Also the most significant novel in this whole book is the mockingbird symbol. Another significant part of the story is the definition of a mockingbird and it is a type of Finch, it’s also a small bird who likes to sing. It got the name mockingbird because when it sings it is mocking other birds. (http://www.allfreeessays.com/essays/The-Significance-Of-The-Title-Of/21174.html)
The mockingbirds in the story were Tom Robinson, Calpurnia, and Boo Radley. Boo Radley was a man who was very nice and loving to others especially the Scout and Jem. One of the nicest things Boo Radley did was when Scout, Jem, and Dill were trying to escape Jem got stuck on the fence, so he left his pants there. Then later he went back for them and they were still there. The next day Jem noticed that they were sowed and that was Boo Radley who sowed those pants. Another nice thing Boo Radley did was when Jem and Scout were getting attacked by Bob Ewell Boo Radley saved them from getting hurt. Through out the story people in the town but especially Jem, Scout, and Dill are wondering why Boo Radley never comes out and play with them during the day. “But they also heard rumors that Boo Radley only comes out at night not during the day.” Scout and Jem start thinking that Boo Radley is a scary man or he is evil. The first time that Scout and Jem saw Boo Radley face, was when he saved them from Bob Ewell. Ever since Boo Radley saved them Jem and Scout stop believing all the rumors they heard about Boo Radley. Boo Radley can be compared to a mocking bird because mockingbirds are calm and don’t hurt others. That’s why Boo Radley is considered a mockingbird because he never hurt any known or bothered any known. The sad part was that Boo Radley was killed by couple of town’s people because he never came out because he was shy. (http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20081010185527AAZEssX)
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