The Modern Family Essay

1042 words - 4 pages

Today the number of single parents has dramatically risen, there’s no other choice but to accept the rising trend. Becoming a single parent today is more of a choice or an inevitable result of tragedy, rather than an effect of unplanned promiscuity as it is misconceived by many. The modern single parent may choose to parent solo because it has become evident that divorce is better option rather than keeping a child in an unhappy and unstable family living situation. Today’s society has created many obtainable avenues to aid in the single parent’s quest to parenthood. In a world where being a single parent is becoming increasingly common, we must evolve our anachronous mindset that only negative circumstances produce and derive from the home of a single parent.
Single-parent families can be defined as families where a parent lives with dependent children, either alone or in a larger household, without a spouse or partner. Until recently, the disfunctionality of nontraditional families was a self-fulfilling assumption; children without a biological mother and father were stigmatized and shunned. Today a surprising majority of youth are being reared by single parents. More than half the children in the United States will spend part of their growing-up years in a one-parent home. Globally, one-quarter to one-third of all families are headed by single mothers, which calls into question the normalness of couple headed families. Despite the volumes of research available on this topic there are still many misconceptions about single mother families based on outdated or anecdotal information.
Single-parent families are generally categorized by the sex of the custodial parent (mother-only or father-only families). Father only families often form as a result of widowhood, desertion by the mother, or wives refusing custody. There has been a 25 percent increase in the number of single fathers in the United States. The increase in father only families is due, in part, to the efforts of fathers to obtain custody of their children. ). Mother only families usually include widows, divorced and separated women, and never married mothers. Teens who account for nearly thirteen percent of births aid in the growing number of mother only families. Because the vast majority of single parents are mothers, most of the research focuses on female-headed families without taking into account that both genders share similar problems and challenges.
Single parents have found that although frowned upon by society, divorce is truly the better option. Particularly divorce may be a more desirable circumstance than the tumultuous marriage that preceded it. Many describe the contentment they feel in having put the tension and dissension of their marriage behind them, and in making a new life for themselves and their children. Children in an unhappy cohabitating family are at more risk of both physical and emotional abuse. Divorce isn’t as bad as many make it out to be when the...

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