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The Monster In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

2189 words - 9 pages

The Monster in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

The novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley was written in 1816 and
published in 1818. During this time this time there was social
revolution and major scientific changes throughout the world. In 1789
the French revolution took place. This is where the peasants revolted
against the lords and the royal family; they stood for liberty,
equality and fraternity. (Shelley was born into a revolutionary left
wing family and then lived the life of one). The world was an unstable
place and there was opportunity for change. In science: electricity
was created foe the light bulb and changed the way people saw things;
machines in factories created difficulties for workers; telephones
which changed communication and the steam train was made which had
defied what people thought impossible. All these things changed the
way of life forever; science was being more and more important and
involving the public not just the scientists. However, people did not
like change especially things that are new and only just made. People
were frightened and apprehensive of these scientific changes as they
were destroying what god had created. Mary Shelley had written the
story on the basis of a nightmare, but we can also say that she was
scared about these scientific changes and had written Frankenstein to
give the effect to the readers that we should leave science alone or
we will get a creation or monster that will destroy us. In today's
science we are going though a similar phase. Although it's about
different things its still change, because now we are entering into an
age of genetically modification and cloning and we don't know what
will happen when we do go deeper into these subjects. People now are
just as scared as people then the change in science in how far it's
going. Frankenstein therefore has the same effect on readers in modern
day about how scientific changes can go wrong and that's frightening
and scary. This makes us see the monster as something that shouldn't
be there before we've even read the story; so we won't be sympathetic
at first towards a creation that we don't want in our lives.

Chapter five is very descriptive as this is where the monster comes to
life; a lot of elaborate and detailed sentences encourage the reader
to 'see' vivid images in their head. Because it's a novel and we don't
see a picture of the creation we use our imagination which is more
powerful in creating bizarre and fear-provoking images. Shelley's
linguistic skill in language causes this, and causes unsympathetic
feelings towards such a grotesque being.

"…dull, yellow eye…" and "…his shrivelled complexion and straight
black lips…"

These quotations demand your mind to feel horrified at what they're
describing; the structure of these sentences evokes disgust by
...

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