The Murder Of Andrew Jackson Essay

644 words - 3 pages

The murderer of President Andrew Jackson was General Sam Houston. He was particularly irritated at Jackson’s policies toward the Native Americans. Houston also disagreed politically with Jackson, and soon formed the Whig Party with others that opposed Jackson. He also hated him because of the way he treated the Cherokees.

        Houston was relatively secret about his hatred for Jackson. He was a dominating man that had a drinking problem and was known for his temper. Houston was once a friend of Jackson, but they soon began to hold opposing views. In 1835, Houston was fighting for the independence of Texas from Mexico. After Texas had won its independence, Houston planned on killing Jackson to get his ultimate revenge over him. In December of 1836, he headed for Washington D.C. to put his plan into action. When he got to Washington, he obtained a Supreme Court pass from Chief Justice Taney over a Native American issue they had been debating for some time before his arrival. Houston wanted to rest and get a place to stay, so he checked in to a hotel. In his room, there was a map of Washington. Houston planned his route to murder Jackson. He circled Chestnut Street because he would be stopping there to pick up some alcohol for the murder. He knew he wouldn’t be able to do it sober, and he knew of a good tavern on Chestnut Street that he could get drunk at before he fulfilled his plan. Houston nosed around the Whitehouse for the rest of the day until he got a feel for his course of action and observed Jackson’s daily routines. That night, Houston went back to his hotel room and read a newspaper article from “The Liberator” that he purchased on his travels throughout the day. The next afternoon, Houston went to the tavern, as planned, got drunk, and purchased a bottle of bourbon to...

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