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The Native Americans' Lack Of Materialism

603 words - 2 pages

People have been living in America for countless years, even before Europeans had discovered and populated it. These people, named Native Americans or American Indians, have a unique and singular culture and lifestyle unlike any other. Native Americans were divided into several groups or tribes. Each one tribe developed an own language, housing, clothing, and other cultural aspects. As we take a look into their society’s customs we can learn additional information about the lives of these indigenous people of the United States.
Ordinarily, Native American tribes were separated by ethno-linguistic groups. The immense linguistic diversity was due to the isolation and disperses of the tribes all throughout the United States. The surviving languages were not numerous and they had the widest geographic distribution that was all over the country. A few became combined with roots of other tribe languages, which evolved new languages and dialects causing a great deal of miscellany and variety. Unfortunately, a large quantity of these languages became extinct with the European contact they were exposed with and soon were not remembered at all.
Despite the fact that language, clothing and other customs also differed between tribes, some aspects are shared between them. They would generally use the same technology or design in weapons, which was a bow and arrow or spear to acquire their food and material for clothing. The bison was an animal that was hunted for its nutritional factor and skin that was used for the clothing. Buffalos were also hunted for their skin and it was perfect to make shelter. The tipi was the tribe’s source of shelter and was portable, durable, and water resistant. Tipis were of great use for Native Americans that moved constantly across terrain.
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