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The Native Son Essay

518 words - 2 pages

Native Son
The novel Native Son, written by Richard Wright, is a book that deals with a poor, black man named Bigger Thomas growing up in a rat-infested one-bedroom apartment on the South Side in Chicago during the Depression. It deals with the racism between blacks and whites, the poor and the rich.
This man Bigger Thomas feels like that he is trapped and doomed to a destiny of constantly being on the bottom of the social ladder because of the whites. He does not like the whites because he thinks of them as being masters or as being people who tell the blacks what to do and where to go. He works as a chauffeur for a family named the Daltons. But one night, as he is driving one of the Daltons, Mary, the daughter, to go meet her Communist boyfriend Jan, the three of them end up drinking and becoming drunk. Bigger drives Mary home and while she is putting Mary into bed, Mary’s blind mother walks in to the room, and Bigger becomes scared that Mary is gonna reveal Bigger’s presence so he smothers her face with a pillow to make her be silent. But as he is doing that, he accidentally kills her so he ends up burning her body in the furnace.
He tries to cover up the whole incident by trying to frame a kidnapping and ransom by signing it “Red” to try to frame Jan, the boyfriend of Mary. But the family ends up finding the bones in the furnace so they find Bigger, and the...

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