The Natives And Europeans In Heart Of Darkness By Joseph Conrad

909 words - 4 pages

Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad there are two social groups represented throughout; the Natives and Europeans. The Europeans were shown living in their own world and having their own set of roles that they desired to reach. The particular description was used to explain in economic terms the power of the world (Europeans) strived for power. In the Heart of Darkness, Europeans which were portrayed through women, lower and higher class men represented the need for power and their own world that the social group lives in.
In the European social group were power and hierarchy was seen as most important the women were seen as inferior the men and too weak to live in the power struggling ...view middle of the document...

Men such as the Brick Maker wanted to figure out ways to rise in power so they could be more socially accepted. “I interrupted, really surprised. He paid no attention,” (94). Marlow had just asked the Brick Maker on this view of Kurtz who was seen as powerful by those lower status men and hated by some that were higher status men. The quote shows that the lower status desire to have power and the general social group ignoring their surroundings. “His need was to exist, and move onwards at the greatest possible risk,” shows the lower status continuing to wanting to be noticed, “need was to exist”, existing at that time was to be known (134). This need to exist was fulfilled by staying by Kurtz’s side and in ways viewing him as a deity or someone who was flawless with high power and high in the social group’s hierarchy. Unlike the women in the social group whom were described to live in their world those within the lower status were shown as those who did the hard work within the group to earn power and a higher social status.
The higher status men were described highly within the social group to show that men with power is what the group desires although there are not many of them these men are the ones such as the Accountant who’s one of the few that views Kurtz’s just as highly as himself even higher because he brings in money for the Company. Basically, the social group is run by the higher...

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