The Nature Of Child Development Essay

1188 words - 5 pages

Human development has been a subject of interest since ancient Greece and Rome. Different approaches derive from two basic directions: the nativists` and empiricists` ones. The latter method is to regard human development as a gradual change which has been influenced by the individual`s experience .On the other hand, the former approach has found its roots in the biological structure of the human organism which considers our development as a series of stages. However, referring to human development only as continuous or gradual would produce inconsistent and insufficient understanding of the developmental process .As a result, combining ideas of both viewpoints(continuity and phases) will provide a more explicit of understanding of the developmental processes and their final aim which is to create individual`s integrity within the social norms.
Jean Piaget(1929), widely known as one of the pioneers in investigating child development, has developed his theory on the basis of cognitive stages. He presents four aspects of the child `s concept formation: sensorimotor ,preoperational, concrete operational and formal operational. All of these stages suggest the emergence of development precedes the ability to learn. Moreover, It is emphasised on the intellectual development regardless of the cultural influences and specific individual differences. Therefore, human cognitive development is regarded as universal for all human species. On the one hand, Piaget sees the human internal conception in interaction with external world messages conveyed. On the other hand, a child`s ability to perceive cognitive information in an effective way is not clearly defined. Resulting from this, old experiences receive new names. According to Piaget theory, human development is completed once the individual reaches the phases of maturation.
Alternatively, Erik Erikson(1965) also describes human development as a series of stages by adopting the psychosocial approach. He distinguishes eight psychological crises(stages) which directly relates to the social requirements and emotional bonds. Human psychosocial development is seen as unique which offers a great range of diversity. Consequently, this variety provides an opportunity of establishing universally necessary and sufficient phases of development. The eight stages form a circle which demonstrates the similarity between the first stage ( trust vs mistrust) and the last one(integrity vs despair).In other words, the human beings strive for integrity which could be reached only by passing successfully through all the phases which is a lifelong experience. Concluding from this, human development is a continuous process which is constructed by different phases. The stages role is to present more concrete and deeper understanding of this process.
Another perspective is also socially orientated but it plays a considerable emphasis on the historically-cultural influences. Lev Vygotsky (1978) also explains human...

Find Another Essay On The Nature of Child Development

The Effects of Socialization on Child Development

834 words - 4 pages When I graduate from the University of Memphis, I want to be able to apply social de-velopment in children developing anxiety disorders while becoming an elementary school teach-er. A child’s exposure to positive socialization and the success of child developmental stages and is what the development of an individual depends on. The following will present the relationship between human development and socialization. Then explain what an

The Effects of Television on Child Development

2024 words - 8 pages The Effects of Television on Child Development (missing works cited) Our generation has been raised in a technological advanced world and there has been definite controversy over many of these innovations that this new culture has brought. An innovation that has troubled the youth of America for many years is television. Although there is no certainty to eliminate this 'plug-in drug,'; there are many ways to control and monitor your

Child Development and the Process of Learning

1355 words - 5 pages on children’s long-term negative development. However Hughes (2008) support parents smacking their children as a form of discipline explaining that parents are able to manage and guide children’s behaviour more effectively. Discipline is not the same as positive guidance where as discipline is demanding the child to get to some kind expectations unwillingly (McFarland, Saunders, & Allen, 2008). For instance a child will be told that he or she

development of a child

2421 words - 10 pages Camila Cooper9UKDLP3134Assignment 1Complete Child Care Course Level 3Camila CooperUKDLP3134Complete Child Care Course Level 3Assignment 11 Summarise the main aspects of development of a child from the age range 0-2 years, 3-5 years and 5-8 years."The study of child development begins with observing children" (Steinberg, Vandell & Bornstein, 2011, p. 3) recognising that "all children including tiny babies are complex human beings and their

Theories of Child Development

1095 words - 4 pages biology. Social and cultural experiences were the basis for his theory. Consciousness was an end product of social interactions (Kearsley, 1994-2010). The history of the child’s society and his own personal history determine how the child thinks. Language is crucial for development as it is with words that a child conceptualizes and makes sense of the world (Schütz, 2004). A precept of Vygotsky’s theory was the zone of proximal development or

Patterns of Child Development

1039 words - 4 pages Patterns of Child Development The various aspects of child development encompass physical growth, emotional and psychological changes, and social adjustments. A great many determinants influence patterns of development and change. On the average, a newborn baby weighs 3.4 kg (7.5 lb) and is 53 cm (21 in) long, with the head disproportionately larger than the lower part of the body. As the child grows, increments in height are greatest

The Development of the Parent/Child Love Relationship

1490 words - 6 pages his development. When function is hampered or the response to separation is out of place for the child’s age or the situation, this anxiety can be considered a clinical condition that may require treatment. The child in this study received appropriate nurturance from his mother in the early phases of his development. He is by nature a somewhat anxious child who sought support from adults as a toddler. However his social and cultural learning

Does religion shape the nature of democratic development?

1753 words - 7 pages that operates within the constraints of the constitution. These parameters help evaluate the impact of specific religions on their government, and will identify which groups obtain true democracy. Christianity, Islam, and Confucianism will be compared to determine their impact on democratic development within a state. When determining whether religion shapes the nature of democratic development, we must first understand if these three religions

How does autism affect the development of a child

885 words - 4 pages Autism usually occurs within the first three years of life, and drastically affects the development of a child. It is also the fastest growing developmental disorder in the United States (Autism Project, 2014). One out of eighty- eight children is diagnosed with Autism, and boys are five times more likely to be diagnosed (ASDS 2013). Many areas of development are affected by autism. This is a disease that disturbs the brains normal development

The Importance of Play in a Child´s Development

723 words - 3 pages engaged in play that develops their fine and gross motor skills. Lastly, The author discusses how play also fosters creative development while simultaneously developing physically, socially, and emotionally. This creative development is believed to be developed by the use of a child’s imagination and role playing. The primary thesis discusses the link between child-led play and the normal, healthy development of children. This article begins

The Importance of Imitation in Early Child Development?

2338 words - 9 pages communication between adult and child, occurs early in a relationship and is a vital starting block for language learning. Colwyn Trevarthen (1979) goes further by suggesting that this kind of early `interpersonal responsiveness' is the starting point from which all human intelligence evolves. Imitation, although important cannot take all the credit for the development of language in children. It is apparent that children quickly learn the

Similar Essays

Influence Of Nature Versus Nurture On Child Development

1334 words - 5 pages Nature as well as nurture can affect the child development. There are many factors that determine the development of a child. Many theories that are proposed by psychologist are used to explain the process of child development. Berndt (1992) explained nature as the impact of the genetic inheritance or heredity of a person during development. Based on Kail’s (2010, p. 135) study, “research reveals consistent genetic influence in many

The Nature Of Development Essay

2436 words - 10 pages the higher influence. While most of the members of these communities acknowledge the fact that both nature and nurture affect development, some believe that only one solely determines certain aspects of life, such as gender. Dr. John Money is one of these people; he believes that gender identity is solely a product of rearing. He advocates that when humans are born, they have a blank psychosexual slate. That is to say that, at birth, individuals

The Influence Of Interactions On Child Development

1564 words - 7 pages , the history and the culture of the society in which a child grows up and the events making up a child’s personal history determine much more than what that child knows or likes. It also determines which mental tools the child will learn and how these tools will shape the child’s mind. Like Piaget, Vygotsky claimed that infants are born with basic abilities for intellectual development. These are called Elementary Mental Functions and include

The Influence Of Play On Child Development

1484 words - 6 pages child’s full time job, the United Nations High Commission for Human Rights listed play as a right of every child (Ginsburg). Through their full time job of play, the children develop emotionally, socially, physically, and creatively. Children need to participate in child-led play in order to facilitate healthy development of their minds, body, and creativity. Play directly influences how children develop both emotionally and socially. Children