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The Necessity Of The U.S. To Advance Towards The Dissolution Of The Cuban Embargo

2259 words - 10 pages

The U.S. currently maintains a relic of the Cold War Era, which is not only unnecessary but holds a possible threat to US-Latin American relations. The initial intent of the embargo was to escape the communist threat posed to the U.S. by Cuba’s alignment with the Soviet Union. However this is no longer a viable reason to maintain the sanctions against Cuba, due to the fall of the Soviet Union and their funding. With a proposed movement towards the termination of the Cuban Embargo, the United States economy has the potential to make an estimated $4.84 billion in exports on an annual basis, and to create a multitude of jobs. With the current economic state of not only the U.S., and Cuba but ...view middle of the document...

The American government retained the ability to revoke visas and prevent access to U.S. markets for those foreign companies found doing business with Cuba, leading to the possibility of sanctions being applied to those non-US companies found to be trading with Cuba. The Helms-Burton Act would also shift the majority of the power to Congress, giving the President less negotiating power in giving concessions to Cuba.
While the U.S. intent on maintaining sanctions with Cuba, pressure from the farm lobbyist called for President Clinton to sign into effect the Trade Sanctions Reform and Export enhancement Act in 2000. This relaxed the embargo to allow for sale of agricultural goods and products to be sold to Cuba on a humanitarian basis on a cash only basis. Cuba withheld purchases until the end of 2001, even then these goods were purchased in order to provide relief after Hurricane Michelle caused a great amount of damage to the island in 2001. The amount of food purchased by Cuba has grown, with America becoming the primary supplier of food since 2007, with total sales in 2008, amounting to $710 million.
Relaxation of travel restrictions in 2008 was a huge step in the proper direction. On March 2009 congress passed provisions in the 2009 appropriations, measure which allowed for the easement of travel restrictions in relation to some family travel and the sale of medical and agricultural goods in Cuba. Subsequently, in April 2009, President Obama announced that his Administration would go further and allow unlimited family travel and remittances” (Fas.org, 2).
In January of 2011, the current administration would further ease restrictions on travel and remittance. These changes included an increase in travel to Cuba, to include religious, educational, cultural or people-to-people purposes. It has also allowed for any citizen of the U.S. to send remittances to family and non-family members. This act has made for easier travel to the island, with international airport having the ability to apply for a license for chartering flights into Cuba. The process has been moving along at a decent pace, showing the U.S. government is on its way to a mended relationship with Cuba. Though it is apparent much work will need to be completed in the evaluation of the Cuban Embargo, and in political relations with Cuba.
Present Situation
The United States is currently one of the only countries which maintain an abnormal diplomatic and trade relationship with Cuba. While there have been multiple adjustments towards the embargo; one step forward, two steps back seem to be the method taken by the Unites States in relation to the Embargo and Cuban. In 2008 Fidel Castro stepped down and handed over the reins to his brother Raul Castro. This change to government has had a positive effect on the country, with Raul putting into effect those things he has spoken out about. He has made tremendous progression through economic and social reform and following in the footsteps...

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