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The Following Is A Compare And Contrast Essay Between The Novels "The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn" By Mark Twain And "Catcher In The Rye" By J.D. Salinger.

1195 words - 5 pages

The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger and Huck Finn by Mark Twain have many similiarities and differences concerning how they are affected by a corrupt society. For example, Both Huck and Holden are disgusted with the societies they experience throughout their lives. Although Huck is mainly disgusted with societies outside of his own and Holden is disgusted by his own society and others he encounters.. Both novels also have clashing and corresponding aspects when considering the concepts of Holden "escaping" from his world and Huck "escaping" to the freedom of the river and frontier. For instance, Huck is escaping from the comformity of his life while Holden is escaping from the phoniness of the world. Although both boys are escaping to find freedom and live the way they want to live.Throughout The Catcher in the Rye, J.D. Salinger shows how Holden is corrupted by society as his life progresses. For example, at the begining of the novel, Holden is expelled from Pency Prep for his refusal to apply himself. He failed 4 of 5 classes and must leave the school after the fall term. Holden does not seem to care that he has been expelled, he is more worried of getting in trouble by his parents. Society has corrupted Holden's likeing of school. Holden believes that everyone in his school is phony, even the teachers. He does not want anything to do with the phoniness of people, even if it means not going to school at all. In Huck Finn, Mark Twain portrays Huck as a boy who dislikes school also. Although he makes progress, Huck refuses to go on an occasion. Huck thinks that school is wasteing his time. Another example of how society has corrupted Holden and Huck is conformity. In Huck Finn, the Widow Douglas and the rest of the town want Huck to be like all the rest of the boys- sophistocated, educated and to stay out of trouble. Of course Huck wouldn't dream of being what they want him to be, he would rather be himself. Huck still is forced learn about God by the Widow Douglas if he wants to or not. By forcing him to pray and worship God, Huck discovers that it is not doing any good for him and he would rather just go to hell. In The Catcher in the Rye, Holden escapes conformity by leaving Pency Prep a week early and not going home. The last example of how society has corrupted the boys are the people who corrupt them in their lives. In Huck Finn, his pap is constantly beating him and threatening to kill him every time he gets drunk. This must put a lot of emotional scars on Huck even though he never presents them to the reader. Like when Huck sees the imprint of his pap's shoes and freaks out about it, Huck is obviously always in terror that his pap will return and kill him. This shows that Huck is not emotioanlly well. In The Catcher in the Rye, Holden is clearly not mentally well. He, like Huck, does not present his emotions to the reader but Salinger makes it evident by the lack of description which shows that there is more to the story than what...

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