The Otomi Indians And Montecillo Essay

1338 words - 5 pages

Montecillo... It has what you like a group of Otomi Indians around 1600 and tarascan avecindaron part of the ejidos in the East of the city of San Luis Potosí. The new settlement was small in size: only consisted of two leagues, measured in terms of the city towards the Cerro de San Pedro, and width less than a quarter of a League. The name of Montecillo, adopted from the outset by its inhabitants according to the titles of erection of the village, was derived from the fact that the lands they settled originally were rough, hilly and fruitless. At this stage of its history, by not por no ser be formal settlement lacked of self-government, and in the Church was subject to the parish of the city of San Luis Potosí. As in the rest of the Indian peoples, also in this settled several families of coyotes, mestizos and mulattos, who joined coexisting peacefully with the Indians. The dedication and the work of its inhabitants soon surrendered its fruits; in the early years the ground they dismounted, opened roads and streets, built jacales, formed gang, dug wells to draw water for human consumption and cultivated corn, which harvested with the rains. From the early years, the new settlement was regarded as important supplier of workers for the benefit of metal farms located in the direction of La Laguna. The impetus shown initially by its inhabitants declined over time, and would not be until late 17TH century and early 18th CENTURIES when he began a phase of sustained growth, which somehow was derived from the establishment of a "room" for Chapel. This attracted the attention of Antonio Fernández del Rivero, Mayor of San Luis Potosí (1697-1700), who for the first time instituted Government in place by appointing Juan Pascual with the post of Mayor. Before the end of the first half of the 18th century, the population of the Montecillo amounted to thirty families of Indians and eight mestizos, who played the offices of Mad Hatter, Weaver and zapatero.

1753 The rate of population had increased markedly, and by then the structure of his Government was more complex: consisted of a mayor, a Lieutenant, a greater sheriff and two topiles. He was Chapel, houses community, jail and cemetery. The inhabitants, besides the above-mentioned offices, working in benefit of silver, but farms no longer as simple pawns or suppliers of coal, wood and Palm, but also as smelter and tuners. From years ago, in addition, they met the real homage paying on time and were involved with the civil and religious authorities of the Mayor's Office in various tasks. This was the basis of the arguments used by the authorities of Montecillo in the month of April of 1753, to request the erection of his community in town, the legal possession of their lands and the faculty to appoint Government officials in the style of the people of Tlaxcala and San Sebastián. Although the company was not easy, on October 24 the same year the viceroy of the new Spain, through the payment of 200 pesos,...

Find Another Essay On The Otomi Indians and Montecillo

Location and Description of the Algonkian Indians

1220 words - 5 pages Location and Description of the Algonkian Indians - Algonkian lived in Quebec and Ontario; starting from the Ottawa valley, beneath Hudson Bay and above lower Ontario - the areas in which they lived in were dense woodlands with trees, such as, birch and evergreen; and snow covered the land most of the year. Adaptation to the physical Environment Home - Algonkian homes were called Wigwam, there frames were built out of saplings of

Summary of “‘Indians’: Textualism, Morality, and the Problem of History”

1403 words - 6 pages Summary of "'Indians': Textualism, Morality, and the Problem of History"In the essay "'Indians': Textualism, Morality, and the Problem of History" written by Jane Tompkins, an English professor at Duke University, the author criticized the history writers and described the issue of problems that are often created by different perspectives from the history on the topic, European -Indian relation, that cannot be determined from right or wrong

Eastern Woodland Indians and the Seven Years' War

1005 words - 4 pages War is always destructive and devastating for those involved leaving behind a trail of death and barren landscape leading to heartbreak and shattered lives. War has its subjugators and its defeated. One enjoys complete freedom and rights while the other has neither freedom nor rights. Defeated and broken is where the Eastern Woodland Indians found themselves after both the Seven Years' war and the American Revolution. The Europeans in their

Native Indians: The Captivity and Restoration by Mary Rowlandson

1159 words - 5 pages As Her Role in the Society The Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration, written by Mary Rowlandson describes the events that she was taken captive alongside a number of people by Native Indians. The story is written in first person; therefore, it has details on the happenings during and after the captives. Mary narrates her experiences and highlights her views of her captors and the Native Indian community at large. The narratives indicate

Cherokee Native American Indians and the Trail of Tears

1519 words - 6 pages Cherokee Native American Indians and the Trail of Tears What made the Cherokee culture distinctive towards others in the Trail of Tears time period was that they had a more peaceful, harmless outlook on the situation. In 1814, Andrew Jackson who would eventually become the President of the United States, had his and his whole army’s lives on the line in the Battle of Horseshoe Bend to the British forces when the Cherokee allied with them to

The Black Legend and White Legend: Relationship Between the Spanish and Indians in the New World

2525 words - 10 pages The Black Legend and White Legend: Relationship Between the Spanish and Indians in the New World The Spanish-Indian relationship can be defined in many ways. One definition used is through the Black Legend and the White Legend. The interpretation of the Black Legend can depend on whom you are talking to. The Black Legend speaks of the Spaniards abusing the Indians and being guilty of much more misconduct than history has ever

Comparing the Cultures of The Ik, The Pomo Indians, and The Nayar Society of Southern India

1755 words - 7 pages Comparing the Cultures of The Ik, The Pomo Indians, and The Nayar Society of Southern India The three cultures I have chosen to talk about in this essay are ‘The Ik’ culture, ‘The Pomo Indians’ and The Nayar Society of Southern India’ The Ik is a culture from Northern Uganda. The Pomo Indians is a culture from (find out more info) and lastly, The Nayar Society is a culture from Southern India. I will also be mentioning some

The Historical Interaction Between the Europeans and Indians in the Disney Movie Pocahontas

1740 words - 7 pages The Historical Interaction Between the Europeans and Indians in the Disney Movie Pocahontas Over the past couple of weeks, we have been studying the story of the Native American (Indian) princess, Pocahontas. We have studied both literature and the 1995 Disney movie. I am going to write about what methods are used to portray the relationship between these two civilisations. Both media portray the same relationship

How Forster Shows the Racial Tension Between the Indians and the British

1480 words - 6 pages How Forster Shows the Racial Tension Between the Indians and the British If we look closely at the words racial and tension, we can see that it is a difficult feeling or nervousness of fear or anger, between two groups of people who do not trust each other. Therefore it can now be closely analysed exactly what is being asked, as within A Passage to India there are several ways in which this subject is addressed. It can

In defense of the Indians by Las Casas and On the Cannibals by Montaigne

1707 words - 7 pages the Europeans during the 1513 conquest. The Spanish Conquest of Central and South America and the voyage to the New World by Christopher Columbus in 1492 brought the Spanish crown a great amount of wealth. The native inhabitants which resided in the Americas prior to the discovery, saw what was once their home being taken away from them and being completely devoured by the Conquistas. In Defense of the Indians by Bartolome de Las Casas and On

Infectious Disease and Demise of the Indians in the New World

2027 words - 8 pages Infectious Disease and Demise of the Indians in the New World The European conquest of the New World was not caused by guns, swords, or barbaric type behavior but by the invisible danger- germs. Infectious diseases have played a major role in shaping the conquest of the New World. Vast amounts of people indigenous to the Americas died due to various types of diseases. It is often said that in the centuries after Columbus landed in the New

Similar Essays

The United States And The Cherokee Indians

2401 words - 10 pages The United States and the Cherokee Indians The debate over the legality of sovereignty and acquired lands from the native Americans, specifically the Cherokee, has long been debated. The issues involved have included treaties, land sold, and the right of the Government to physically enforce their rules on Indian land "sovereignty". This paper will examine the strategy used by the Federal Governments, the State Governments as well as

Columbus, The Indians, And Human Progress

729 words - 3 pages In this chapter Howard Zinn gives countless events on the different encounters from Columbus to Corte’s, Pizarro and the Puritans against the Indians such as the Arawaks, Aztecs, Powhatans and the Pequots. Zinn goes into great details on the horrific attacks and raids by Columbus and his crew sailing from island to island in the Caribbean taking the Indians captive in search for land, gold and slaves. Some of the Indians fled when they heard

Deontology In Jim And The Indians

1112 words - 5 pages Jim has found himself in a quandary. When arriving in a South American town he has happened upon a captain and his army about to assassinate twenty Indians in order to deter other Indians protesting against the government. Jim is treated as a guest to the town and offered the privilege of shooting one of the Indians in which case the captain will let the other nineteen go, however declining this offer will mean the captain will carry on as

Tepeticpac Indians And The Town Of Tlaxcala

1158 words - 5 pages Tlaxcala... It has what you like was founded in 1591 by a group of thirty families of tlaxcaltec, originating in the header of Tepeticpac, Indians who – as part of the project of colonization of the frontier chichimeca - months ago had been settled in Mexquitic. At this stage Tlaxcala, or Tlaxcalilla, it received the name of the town of Nuestra Señora de los Remedios, settling in the current founders Plaza. Later, between June and July next year