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The Perfect Wrong Dreams In Death Of A Salesman By Arthur Miller

1068 words - 4 pages

In the drama Death of a Salesman written by Arthur Miller, the main character Willy appears to have a form of Alzheimer’s in his old age while repetitively reminiscing of previous times with his family and work profession. Willy seems to have unwillingly convinced his son Biff to be an underachiever when Biff caught his father Willy in an affair with a client’s secretary. When Biff found out about the affair he soon decided he would not attend summer school putting his dreams of playing college football behind, soon to lead to a life of failures. Although from that point on Biff resents his father, Biff never tells Linda of the affair.
In the beginning of the play, Willy boasts of his success in his sales in Boston, Massachusetts. Linda soon reminds him that his sales were to barely be considered a success. Linda supports Willy in every way she can hoping to prevent him from attempting to kill himself again as he has tried to in the past according to her. She is afraid that his disappointment in his and Biff’s failures keeps him in an unstable mental state that almost constantly keeps him falling into flashbacks of his past memories when things with the family were still well. He often has flashbacks of his successful brother Ben, considering that Willy appears to be a man only focused on financial success, Willy has flashbacks and hallucinations of him often because of Willy’s jealousy of his brother’s success.
As the play continues, Linda and Willy convince Biff to go to an old friend of his in order to discuss a business proposal in order for Biff and Happy to begin their way to financial success. He gets to his meeting and soon realizes that he was never a salesman and never got along with him to begin with. Biff and Happy meet with their father Willy at a local restaurant to talk about their days over dinner and drinks. Happy arrives at the restaurant first when he notices a beautiful woman at a table when he insists that she and a friend join himself and Biff for dinner and drinks and planned to rid of his father for the night. Biff shows up next and explains that everything went terribly bad at the meeting and tells Biff he refuses to leave his father for the girls.
Later when Willy shows up, Willy explains that he was fired from his job as a salesman earlier that day and before Biff can explain his day, Willy falls into the flashback of himself and his client’s secretary in a hotel room in which the affair takes place. Biff comes into Willy’s room and explains to his father that he had gotten into trouble at school and is not doing well in math. Willy asked Biff to explain what had happened when the mysterious woman walked out of Willy’s bathroom with his Linda’s stockings. Willy tried to explain otherwise when Biff told him to stop lying. As a result, Biff did not go to summer school and...

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