The Perils Of Factory Farming Essay

2058 words - 8 pages

1GartzmanOlivia GartzmanDallas, MerrittEn 102-04320 March 2013The Perils of Factory Farming.Have you ever thought about the idea of animal farming operations, specifically regarding chickens? The idea of chickens ingesting food filled with antibiotics to make them less susceptible to disease puts humans at a medical disadvantage. When human beings are bombarded with antibiotics that are in the chicken and eggs that we eat when we are buying factory farmed poultry, our immune systems are affected as our bodies are getting used to the antibiotics. Factory farming not only impacts the food we eat, but also affects the water and air around these farms.At the time the baby chicks arrive, the houses are moderately clean and initially appear to be quite spacious. However, when they are fully grown the average is less than a square foot of floor space per bird. The windows are adjusted for heat, and the dead chickens are gathered for removal. They are then moved to dead pits, which are ten to fifteen feet deep, and ten to fifteen feet wide. They are covered by a concrete slab. The chickens from this point have produced a large amount of waste, which has taken up a lot of space all the remaining space of the chicken house. If we are to have any optimism for our future generations' health, and for chickens' lives to continue to prosper on this earth, we need to adjust our farming operations in general, specifically in this case chicken farming, and begin thinking about the long-term health risks and future environmental problems. Rather than relying upon a farming operation that may be easier, quicker, and cheaper, we need to resort to another method of farming, free-range, that is healthier for humans and one that is more humane for the animals. This manner of farming may require more work, but it is going to be a more beneficial operation for our future. By refining and performing an environmentally friendly farming operation, animals can live a good life, the life that they do have, and humans can stay susceptible to antibiotics. Being introduced to the many differences between free-range farming and factory farming, including public health issues, water, air and land quality, and the difference in cost of the two farming operations. These are all ways that farmers can consider in changing the way our meat is produced and modify farming operations to a more humane system.Free-range farming operations are a great alternative way of farming, and it is safer and healthier for the environment. Free- range poultry are raised outdoors with exposure to sunlight and are fed a grain-based diet. In the article "The taste of happiness: free-range chicken", Mara Miele describes the process of free-range operations and how this way of farming is viewed by others. Miele explains that free-range systems of production are seen as more friendly than the more common indoor, severe systems because it allows more freedom to the birds. Miele proposes that, "these systems...

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