The Philosophical Question Of Suicide Essay

2592 words - 10 pages

The more a question is argued the better that question becomes it is often said. That question begins to grow and the side effect of this is the more people it reaches. Whether that question can be put into a category of right or wrong it begs to be answered. Knowledge is something that people instinctively need to function when faced with a problem, an answer must be found or it begins to form eminent possibility in any direction. The problem is a question that no one can truly answer for anyone other than the person faced with it, which is one's own self. The arguments from either side of this philosophical problem must not be centered around one's own belief but all that share the dilemma, which is in fact every human being. Suicide, that is the one thing that every person who is physically capable has the ability to do. The philosophical question of suicide is truly a serious one, so serious in fact that some have proclaimed it to be the only question. To live or to die, a choice that some hold so high as to say it is the only one problem any one person can face. This problem is one seen by many as a philosophical problem and that idea does hold ground. Grounds being that if one dies then the other questions do not really matter in life, as with the invert of this to live. When one is alive all philosophical question matter every second that one is breathing but can be all can be ended with one act. So if life is the beginning of all the problems, then suicide is the ending to every problem. With such a serious question many will have very enlighten and fictitious answers on the philosophical problem of suicide. The philosophical problem of suicide will have supporters and opponents and those people have adequate supportive arguments for both sides of the spectrum.
Albert Camus once was quoted saying ," There is but one truly serious philosophical problem and that is suicide. Judging whether life is or is not worth living amounts to answering the fundamental question of philosophy. "(The Myth of Sisyphus). This is a philosophical statement to some others as with Camus see this a true and evident problem. So many will turn this into a argument for which no side could win. The argument cannot be won by many because they simply will not take their own selves out of the equation. One of the top reasons a person is said to want to die is that the individual has a philosophical desire to die. This desire can be broke down into different patterns or traits the person holds deep inside themselves, also there could be outside factors influencing this. Doctor Alex Lickerman of the University of Chicago states, "These people aren’t depressed, psychotic, maudlin, or crying out for help. They’re trying to take control of their destiny and alleviate their own suffering, which usually can only be done in death."( reasons why people comment suicide). These people are not clinically depressed, they are making the choice to take control of their...

Find Another Essay On The Philosophical Question of Suicide

The Value of Philosophical Thinking Essay

1353 words - 5 pages The study of Philosophy is often under serious suspicions from society of being somewhat useless. It provides no immediate answers or results, leaves one with uncertainty and unanswerable questions, and also a complicated view of the life in this world. This is to say the value of philosophizing is not obvious and not easily attained. As it has been pointed out, the pursuit of philosophical knowledge does not often bring wealth or concrete

Philosophical Naturalism and the Origin of Life

693 words - 3 pages Upon considering the origin of man, a purely naturalistic philosophy that refuses to acknowledge a supernatural and transcendental cause is unable to provide a full account of anthropogenesis. One could examine this inability from two perspectives: in answering the question as to how life or “being” came into existence, and in answering the question as to why life or “being” came into existence and continues. Both of these questions give rise

Philosophical Works and The Meaning of Reality

1402 words - 6 pages Philosophical Works and The Meaning of Reality I would put the texts in the following order: William James - Some Problems of Philosophy Rene Descartes - Meditations on First Philosophy Non-Cartesian Soums Luckmann & Berger -- The Social Construction of Reality George Orwell -- 1984 Hannah Arendt -- Eichmann in Jerusalem Lem -- The Futurological Congress Ong -- Orality & Literacy Jean-Paul Sartre -- Nausea Abram -- The

Suicide and the Predictions of Suicide

1859 words - 7 pages Suicide and the Predictions of Suicide In the first paper I read about hopelessness and eventual suicide, four authors studied 207 hospitalized patients with suicidal ideation. There was a follow up period of 5-10 years when these patients were systematically checked up on to see their status. Fourteen eventually completed suicide within the follow up period. In the study the researchers used the Beck Depression

"Lord of the Flies" Philosophical Essay

1156 words - 5 pages Dr. Mortimer Adler wrote the book Great Ideas from the Great Books. In his book he wrote about human nature and behavior, which is a common point in the book Lord of the Flies. Dr. Adler answered a lot of complicated philosophical questions in essay forms. One of theses questions was: " Are there any absolute distinctions between what is right and what is wrong? Or are such distinctions merely an expression of particular culture or of personal

The Question of Being

1313 words - 5 pages The Question of Being Martin Heidegger attempts to answer the “question of Being” by appealing to the terminology and methodology of Dasein, most commonly defined as existence. Dasein is not simply any kind of existence, however, but an existence that is unique from all other existences in that it asks the question of existence while existing in the existence itself. In other words, one must first understand Dasein in order to understand

The Question of Alcibiades

960 words - 4 pages Alcibiades was a highly motivated individual with a drive to gain power by any means necessary. Alcibiades’ upbringing conditioned him, one might say entitled him, to power and influence, and his self-serving actions had the sole objectives of surpassing his predecessors and achieving glory. To understand the motivation of Alcibiades, we must look to his upbringing and character to examine his sense of entitlement. Alcibiades was born into an

The Question of God

765 words - 3 pages interest in the academic world, but the stress and pressure of day-to-day life forces us to deal with a very pragmatic way of making decisions. I was lucky to attend a live viewing of an important PBS series exploring the question of God. This theme is as old as civilization, and I found this event a great chance to develop my understanding and general idea of existence of God and other related questions.The lecture was very interesting and explored a

The Question of Palestine

1346 words - 5 pages In titling his book, Edward W. Said intended three types of meanings by stating "the question of." First is that Palestine is a matter apart from all others and must be dealt with apart from any other situation in the Middle East. Second, "the question of" refers to the long standing and insistent dilemma going on. Third, "the question of" suggests that the status of Palestine is uncertain. He assumes that the reader is aware of the pro

The Question of Goverment

1474 words - 6 pages The Question of Goverment There has been demanding controversies concerning how a successful government should be maintained. Many writers and politicians have written a great deal of political propaganda, including several documents that exhibit different opinions on how an organization, such as a government, or club should uphold laws, written or unwritten. Such documents include Lao Tzu’s, “Thoughts from the Tao-te Ching,” Niccolo

The Question of Truth

2033 words - 9 pages Do we really know what the “truth” is? How can we distinguish what the truth is in real life? Are you every completely sure of the truth? In the Question of the Truth Unit we read a variety of selections based off of people’s perception of the truth, though in many of these selections the truth wasn’t what people expected. These selections help develop a contrast between how things seem on the surface, and how they really are. A couple of

Similar Essays

The Quarrel About The Philosophical Question Of The Historical Explanation

612 words - 2 pages The discussion of the philosophical question of historical explanation is in reality a disagreement concerning the nature of the philosophic method.There are primarily two sides taken in this argument, those who agree with Carl Hempel and those that do not.According to Hempel a historical event is only sufficiently explained when it logically fits a set of confirmed pre-existing conditions along with some universal laws.Certainly all things

The Significance Of Philosophical Scepticism Essay

1828 words - 7 pages The Significance of Philosophical Scepticism In answer to the question 'What can we know?' anyone who gives a pessimistic answer is labelled a sceptic. Scepticism is associated with incredulity. A sceptic is someone who questions things (particularly received opinions) and also practices suspension of judgement. This questioning outlook has been labelled by some as practical scepticism. However, philosophical scepticism involves more than

The Problems Of Philosophical Anarchy Essay

1082 words - 4 pages The oxford dictionary defines anarchism as “belief in the abolition of all government and the organization of society on a voluntary, cooperative basis without recourse to force or compulsion.” Therefore, philosophical anarchism is a form of political philosophy which rejects all types of hierarchy and authority not just states or governments. However, there are a number of problems with philosophical anarchism. Firstly, the most prominent

The Philosophical Teachings Of Supernatural Essay

1691 words - 7 pages mainstream television show are many philosophical teachings expressed through the plot and dialogue several of the show’s episodes. In the show Supernatural, many of the philosophical teachings of Freud, the Rule Utilitarians, and the Stoics are present within the storyline. In the season two episode “Bloodlust,” the character Gordon Walker exhibits the ideas of Rule Utilitarianism. In this episode, Gordon uses his past experiences to