This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

The Poem "Piano" By David Herbert Richards Lawrence

834 words - 3 pages

Introduction:David Herbert Richards Lawrence was a very important and controversial English writer of the 20th century, whose prolific and diverse output included novels, short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel books, paintings, translations, literary criticism, and personal letters. The passing of time in a person's life is filled with many different stages. The poem "Piano" by D.H. Lawrence is a complicated example of how a poet might think.D. H. Lawrence was born on 11 September 1885 in Eastwood, a coal-mining village in Nottinghamshire England and died from Tuberculosis on March 2, 1930.Analysis:The poem 'piano' is a very bewildering poem, as there are many different ways of analysing the poem.The speaker in "Piano" seems to be proud to be a full grown man, yet he loves remembering his happy childhood, and this nostalgic attitude causes him to feel guilty as if he has betrayed his present state of being, though other readers might think differently. Through effective imagery, Lawrence is able to help the reader understand the speaker's nostalgic attitude. The language is intimate and conversational. It is also the language of narrative as the speaker is telling it like a story, building up a climax.In the first stanza, the author describes an image of the present in the first two lines, and then the last two lines are spent describing his comfortable past. A woman is performing and singing for him. The speaker creates an interesting atmosphere by using the word ‘softly’ and setting the action at dusk. The woman’s singing opens up the speaker’s memory, taking him back in time, "Taking me back down the vista of years". He then sees himself as a child playing with his mother’s feet as she sings for him at a piano. He remembers the great noise made by the strings of the piano. Thus a conflict of imagery is made. The woman in the present is set against the woman from his past, his mother. His mother smiles warmly at him as he sings.In the second stanza, the speaker admits he tries to stay focused on the present. But the emotional power of the song drags him back to his past. The song’s intensity has a secret influence on him. It seems in his heart he longs for the secure and cozy Sunday evenings of his childhood with his mother singing to him. He fondly remembers the wintry scene outside as the family group sang...

Find Another Essay On The poem "Piano" by David Herbert Richards Lawrence

The Piano by Jane Campion Essay

1198 words - 5 pages Activity One: A, Social Context The Victorian and values of the 1900's had a large impact on the film "The Piano" written and directed by Jane Campion.Gender roles were made plainly clear in the opening scenes of the film. Males had the power of decision making in society. Ada's voice in the first scene told us "my father has married me to a man today that I have not even met yet…" Ada was not asked for either her consent or disapproval

Money Obsession in David Herbert Lawrence's The Rocking-Horse Winner

1053 words - 4 pages Money Obsession in David Herbert Lawrence's The Rocking-Horse Winner We have all heard the expression, "Money makes the world go round." But does this make it worthwhile to abandon happiness in order to gain more of it? David Herbert Lawrence reveals the folly of substituting money and luck for family and love in "The Rocking-Horse Winner," the story of a woman's insatiable need to become rich, and her son's struggle to gain her approval

Poem Commentary: Constantly Risking Absurdity by Lawrence Ferlinghetti

1027 words - 4 pages Constantly Risking Absurdity by Lawrence FerlinghettiCommentaryConstantly risking absurdity is a poem by Lawrence Ferlinghetti. The poem is an extended metaphor comparing writing poetry to preforming dangerous acrobatics. It has a very original layout and complicated structure. The poem is not very long, but it is precise and clear, it does so through great use of imagery and diction. It is the harsh truth of poetry writing, and really of all

"The Collar" by George Herbert(1593-1633)

901 words - 4 pages poem's conclusion. With the poem's conclusion it is made to look ridiculous. In justifying his rebellion against the Divine yoke Herbert talks of religious prescriptions as a "cage" or "rope of sands" which is only made to seem "good cable" by the poet's own "pettie thoughts". Yet, as he admits God as Lord, Herbert makes it clear that it is the attempt to rebel which is like "sand" and that the true "pettie thoughts" are those he has just asserted

"Piano and Drums" DRUMS by Gabriel Okara: Discuss the following poem, commenting in particular on the ways in which the narrator responds to the two kinds of music

1163 words - 5 pages nation. The author's use of language techniques during Piano and Drums particularly shows the narrator's response to the two kinds of music to distinguish between the first culture and the new, modern society.Lastly, arrays of sound techniques are used by Okara to articulate his reply to the piano and drums. The enjambments throughout the poem give it a very fast tempo to possibly show that the changes in culture happen so fast. This links to a large

Susanna at the Beach by Herbert Gold

1957 words - 8 pages Susanna at the Beach, by Herbert Gold, presents a tale of the virtues characters admire strictly contrasting with the vices for which characters are consumed. The characterization of the main character, Susanna, is portrayed as embodying seven “heavenly virtues” including chastity, temperance, diligence, patience, kindness, humility, and charity. While the other characters in the story personify the seven “deadly sins” including lust, gluttony

"The Time Machine" by Herbert George Wells

2970 words - 12 pages Herbert George Wells was born in 1866 in Bromley, Kent, a few miles fromLondon, the son of a house-maid and gardener. Wells died in 1946, awealthy and famous author, having seen science fiction become arecognized literary form and having seen the world realize some ofscience fiction's fondest dreams and worst fears. Wells mother attemptedto find him a safe occupation as a draper or chemist.Wells had a quick mind and a good memory that enabled

The Piano Lesson by August Wilson

2410 words - 10 pages The Piano Lesson by August Wilson: The Wisdom of the Ivories Can a treasured object of the past serve as a teacher for the future? Once people share the historical significance of it, an object can symbolize the overcoming of hardships of those lives in which it becomes a part. Therefore, it may indeed “instruct” future generations to glean wisdom from the past. August Wilson’s play The Piano Lesson centers on the trials and triumphs of a

Analysis: The Piano Lesson by August Wilson

2242 words - 9 pages August Wilson’s The Piano Lesson, tells a story of a family haunted by the pain of their past and their struggle to find peace to move forward. The story begins with character Boy Willie coming up from the south visiting his sister Bernice. Boy Willie introduces the idea of selling the family’s heirloom, a piano, to raise enough money to buy the land on which his ancestors were enslaved. However, both Boy Willie and his sister Berniece own

The Piano Lesson by August Wilson

1505 words - 6 pages “I got the power of death” (Wilson 29). You might recognize this quote from Boy Willie in The Piano Lesson by August Wilson an African American play writer. In this essay I am going to highlight some things about his life. According to (Britannica Concise Encyclopedia) August Wilson was born on April 27, 1945 in the town of Pittsburgh Pennsylvania. He was born Frederick August Kittel, Jr. Son of a German immigrant named Frederick August Kittel

Analysis of Beautiful Old Age By D.H. Lawrence. This essay is on the subject matter, form, stlye and theme of the poem

1315 words - 5 pages 1.Subject Matter (Content)"Beautiful Old Age" by D.H. Lawrence is a poem that describes old age. The author depicts old age as something that is "lovely", wonderful, calm and undisturbed.We would feel as though we have completed most of our lives. We would have already fulfilled our duties as a man. We would have experienced the ups and downs of life and look forward to more settled days.We would be happy in our old age if we had lived our lives

Similar Essays

Similarities In Work By Emily Elizabeth Dikinson And David Herbert Lawrence

827 words - 3 pages Although Emily Elizabeth Dikinson and David Herbert Lawrence lived and wrote during two different times, and in different parts of the world, their poetry contains many similarities. At the time Dikinson was being laid to rest in Massachusetts, Lawrence was born in Nottingham, England. Also, along with the likenesses, they both have many differences. These affinities and dissimilarities can be seen in poems written by these authors dealing with

Analysis Of "The Piano" By D.H. Lawrence

702 words - 3 pages Analysis of "Piano"The speaker in "Piano" by D. H. Lawrence is proud to be a full grown man, yet he loves remembering his happy childhood; his nostalgic attitude causes him to feel guilty as if he had betrayed his present state of being. Through effective imagery, Lawrence is able (to describe an image) to help the reader understand the speaker's nostalgic attitude. The diction and tone used in this poem reveal the speaker's struggle as his

Causes And Consequences Of Rebellion: "Mercy Among The Children" By David Adams Richards

1347 words - 5 pages In modern world, few people follow Christ's philosophy of non-violence. In fact, most people follow the philosophy of revenge and payback. The reason for people not following the philosophy of non-violence lies in its difficulty and the belief that people will take advantages of them. In the novel of "Mercy Among the Children" by David Adams Richards. The author uses the devices of point of view, narrative structure and characterization to

The Flower, Essay On The Poem By George Herbert, Detailed Analysis

1039 words - 4 pages "The Flower" by George Herbert is an exuberant, joyful poem in which a single image of the spiritual life is expanded with naturalness and elegance that appear effortless. Herbert refines a style in which the writer tries to write honestly and directly from experience: his imagery is more homely and accessible than John Donne's: if nothing is too exotic for inclusion in Donne's verse, nothing is too ordinary for inclusion in Herbert's. But this