The Power Of Dreams Essay

1459 words - 6 pages

The powers of dreams have always been underestimated. There is a whole new world in the sub conscious mind that helps us in a subtle way. In this project you will see how a baby was born because of a dream, how nightmares can be partially good for you, be given a background on dreams in general and details on interpreting your own dreams amongst other things.BackgroundEverybody dreams but not everybody can remember them. We usually don't remember dreams when we suddenly wake up and move about. This happens when you are usually in a rush, when your alarm clock goes off or you are pressured to get up quickly. You remember dreams on such occasions as you lie in on the weekends when you wake up slowly and gradually change from the sub-conscious mind to the conscious mind. This is called lucid dreaming. With this you can take partial control of what happens during a dream. Since you can do this you don't have to be restricted to do all the things you do in real life but you could do whatever you like because it's your mind that's controlling you not your body and gravity. For example, you could fly or walk through walls.The powers of dreamsThe dreaming world could be a very powerful thing so much so that it causes a baby to be born because of lucid dreaming. In a true story taken from the book called Living with Dreams a woman dreamt that she just had a period in her dreams. This was so realistic that she actually thought she had a real period not one dreamt up in a dream. A few days later she had sex thinking that it was the best time to have sex without becoming pregnant. Two or three weeks she felt something strange was happening and so consulted a doctor who said that she had become pregnant. All this happened just because of a dream.Another dream that caused panic was when a student from university had just completed a project and all he had to do was hand it in the morning. Because he was thinking about this project so much the project became a part of his dreams. In his dreams he had dreamt of handing it in. So the next morning he got up thinking that he had handed in his project and went to university with the project back home. The previous two examples tell us what dreams can make us think and that they can have such an effect on our lives.Interpreting dreamsMany people haven't got the skills of understanding what exactly their dreams mean. For somebody to interpret other people's dreams they need to know a lot about the person they're interpreting for as well as the dream itself. To explain this, for example, seeing a elephant might mean totally different things to different people such as a zoo keeper who'll probably see it as a harmless and a beautiful mammal whilst another person might see the elephant as a ugly, dangerous animal. With this example it tells us that everybody is different and the same dream with a elephant could be differently interpreted to everybody. Because everybody is different, and the same dreams mean different...

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