The Power Of Speech: Sir William Wallace

707 words - 3 pages

Sir William Wallace was a Scottish property-owner who come to be one of the central leaders throughout the Wars of Scottish Independence. Along with Andrew Moray, Wallace overpowered an English army at the Battle of Stirling Bridge in September 1297, and was granted Protector of Scotland, serving till his death at the Battle of Falkirk in 1298. Mel Gibson plays’ William Wallace, a 13th-century Scottish soldier that led the Scots in the First War of Scottish Independence against King Edward I of England. This speech uses a variety of different techniques and methods to motivate his viewers into accepting and believing that freedom is precious. Freedom in the 13th century was cherished greatly as it’s “the state of not being imprisoned or enslaved”.
The power of this speech integrates from a mixture of his movement upon his horse. Instead of just standing in one spot, speaking to the power before him, he trotted forward and back, speaking to each and every one of the army. He ...view middle of the document...

He highlighted the pride that each individual must have in defending his family and his home.

The speech, “Freedom” uses several methods which are essential to persuasion. Wallace uses matter to induce the Scottish with a “Quality not quantity, persuasive” context. Wallace repetitively repeats the phrase ‘Freedom’ throughout the speech. By doing this, it continually reminds the Scots what freedom is really about, and how it is such a treasured concept during the war. Emotive language is used regularly within the speech. “Fight and you may die. Run, and you'll live... at least a while. And dying in your beds” Wallace uses powerful words to convey the audience a message what to consider or believe. One of the most precious possessions of every individual is freedom. There was a time in history when freedom in the world did not exist. People had no freedom, for they were governed by tyrants and their empires. They were slaves at the mercy of one man who headed the empire. Wallace knows that ‘seeking for freedom’ will help to address war and convince the scots to reflect on the protection of their families and generations. The quote “. You've come to fight as free men... and free men you are. What will you do with that freedom?” has a cumulative effect, as its repeating the word ‘free’ to endure the audience. Repetition is also used when said “ALBA GU BRÀTH” by the army, Alba gu bràth is a Scottish Gaelic expression used to express loyalty to Scotland. It means "Scotland forever" when translated to English. This phrase motivates the rest of the army to correlate and gather as one to ‘take over the English’.

In conclusion, it is obvious that Wallace was greatly effective in his speech. Wallace communicated to the addressees in a way to persuade any man to fight for their freedom and alongside of him. The language techniques used were greatly successful in portraying the Scottish army. Within the speech, ‘matter’ was a great contribution in order to get the message of ‘freedom’ being so precious across the audience. In the point that he thrived in making the men stand up in contradiction of their common rival, despite their doubts and fears, I believe that this speech was entirely successful along with the focus question.

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