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The Power Of The Internet And Women’s Rights In Guatemala

2178 words - 9 pages

Introduction
With the rapid growth of new digital media technologies, such as the Internet, the public has more choices and opportunities to communicate with people globally. As Bill Gates proclaimed, “the Internet is becoming the town square for the global village of tomorrow.” Media can determine the tremendous role its play in not only our daily lives but also its profound impact on modern society’s cognitive perception of the world. The initial proposal for this paper is to answer how the Internet transforms Guatemalan society as well as improves Guatemalan women’s right, in particular, indigenous women in rural areas. The first assumption here is that the Internet is a vital tool to raise awareness of women’s rights in Guatemala. Minorities in the country, particularly indigenous women have less equally or inferiorly treated by its society. On the other hand, Guatemalan women’s liberation is an inseparable piece of its society’s liberation, which would drive economy flourish and politics more actively. In the context of women’s liberation, the education for women has significantly affected the region. According to the USAID, “more than two million children do not attend school – most of them are indigenous girls in rural areas.” Ultimately distribution of more equal educational opportunities for women plays a significant role in achieving social, political and economic equality in society. So the second assumption and more contentious one is that through utilizing an emerging new media and improving women’s rights in Guatemala, this country would be able to rise in GDP and per capita as well as more active political participation, which could reform a democratic system in Guatemala. By undertaking an in-depth analysis, it is hoped this would provide reasons for the importance of the Internet as a vital tool for Guatemalan society.

Backgrounds of Women’s Rights in Guatemala
According to the USAID report, more than twenty-five percent of the population in Guatemala is indigenous women. They have endured social discrimination, a continuous culture of violence and groaned under oppression. The issue of women’s rights in the country is that even though there is a law on violence against women, offenders would not be detained nor under a prison sentence. This causes an alternative issue, which women are prevented from accessing to the judicial system (The OECD Development Centre). Furthermore since Guatemala is the exclusively men dominant society, women’s role in politics and economy is similarly sidelined. Although participation of women in politics gradually has increased compared to the past few decades ago, there are still difficulties to raise social awareness in Guatemalan society about the gravity of women’s rights. Luciak (2001) points out a fundamental element of Guatemalan society’s development is “to promote the effective and efficient incorporation, participation and representation of the Guatemalan woman in the political,...

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