This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

The Powerful Use Of Imagery And Metaphor In A Noiseless Patient Spider By Walt Whitman

647 words - 3 pages

The heart of poetry is in its imagery, which leads the reader to perceive all of the senses the poet was feeling – the sights, sounds, scents, touches. A poet uses imagery to evoke these emotions in the reader to paint a mental picture – to “show” the reader the experience that inspired the poet, not just “tell” the story. In “A Noiseless Patient Spider,”
Walt Whitman’s use of metaphor and powerful imagery emphasizes the speaker’s own search for soulful connectedness to the world. As written in the second stanza at line six “And you, O my soul where you stand, / Surrounded, detached, in measureless oceans of space, /Ceaselessly musing, venturing, throwing, seeking the spheres to connect them…” (Whitman 720) brings forth the visual image of a disconnected soul floating and searching through the universe for something to connect with to fill the void in the speaker’s soul. Whitman’s use of emotive imagery and metaphor to evoke the lost and lonely emotions of the speaker allows the reader to identify with his need to fill that void.
The imagery in the first stanza is entirely devoted to the isolation of the spider and its relationship to the world as a metaphor to the speaker’s own feelings of remoteness in his soul:

A noiseless patient spider,
I marked where on a little promontory it stood isolated,
Marked how to explore the vacant vast surrounding,
It launches forth filament, filament, filament, out of itself,
Ever unreeling them, ever tirelessly speeding them (Whitman 720).
The reader can easily visualize the spider, sitting atop a promontory in the water, alone, isolated launching it’s silk out of itself to connect to another rock, landmass, “thing.” The emphasis on the spider alone, remote in the “vacant vast surrounding” (Whitman 720) is analogous to how the speaker is feeling in comparison to his own life – alone, in the universe, trying to reach out. The spider’s filament coming out...

Find Another Essay On The Powerful Use of Imagery and Metaphor in a Noiseless Patient Spider by Walt Whitman

Discuss the idea of change in the novel, paying attention to the authors' use of metaphor and imagery to denote change and comments and actions of Fridaus.- "Woman At Point Zero" by Nawal El Sadaawi

898 words - 4 pages until she decides to face death she is no longer uncertain about her position in society, and only then she accepts her place and decides to end her search for acceptance. Throughout the novel Nawal El Saadawi's use of metaphor and imagery is constantly evident, and it helps promote the incentive Saadawi has in mind for the reader to acknowledge.One of the earliest, and probably most significant changes she goes through, are involving eyes. From

Identities and Transcendentalism in Song of Myself by Walt Whitman

1055 words - 4 pages Identities and Transcendentalism in Song of Myself While reading through the poem Song of Myself by Walt Whitman, what comes to your mind? His deep love for nature? The use of symbolism throughout the poem? Whitman’s questionable homoeroticism that seeps its way throughout the lines? What came to the forefront of mind when reading this poem by Whitman was his deliberately obvious theme of individuality while also maintaining a universal

Egalitarianism in The Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman

1234 words - 5 pages alluring sexuality side of men have on women. Whitman also tries to express his democratic view within the last sections of the poem. He focuses on mainly slavery within the old days. He is against slavery and he places the setting at an auction. He describes the body of the black as if they are mere objects that might be of use. He argues about the inhumanity of it all. In section 8 of the poem it is based off the attraction of a woman attributes

In the Eyes of Walt Whitman

1010 words - 4 pages escape from the problems of the world but engages and, as far as possible, resolves them. Through his poetry, Walt Whitman has managed to intrigue us as a nation and leaves a record for generations of the emotions of a changing time in history.Bibliography:Reader's Guide by G.W. Allen (1970); Critical Essays on Walt Whitman,ed. byJ. Woodress (1983); Language and Style by C.C.Hollis (1983); WaltWhitman byJames E. Miller Jr., Helen Regenstein (1990

A Critical Review of "Leaves of Grass" By Walt Whitman

1728 words - 7 pages 1 A Critical Review of "Leaves of Grass" By Walt Whitman Masoud Shahnazari Azad University of Kerman Instructor: Dr. Khozaei Introduction Walter Whitman, the poet known as the American bard was born in West Hills, Long Island in New York on May 31, 1819. His mother, Louisa, immigrated from Holland and his father, Walter, from England. Whitman's father worked mostly with his hands as a carpenter and a house builder and Whitman himself would

The Life of Walt Whitman

1512 words - 7 pages parents had little education and were farm people (“Whitman, Walt”). His father struggled to support the family by being a farmer, a carpenter, and an unsuccessful real estate speculator (Prairie Public). Once Walt was out of school he learned the printing trade (“Whitman, Walt”). He worked for several newspapers in Brooklyn, Long Island and New York City (Prairie Public). When he was printing for these newspaper companies sometimes he would enter in

The Life of Walt Whitman

1350 words - 6 pages , and by engaging everyone he met in conversation or a debate. In 1831 Whitman became an apprentice on a working class newspaper. This is where he learned the printing trade and was first exposed to the excitement of putting words into print. By the age of twelve Whitman had begun getting his own work published. By 1833, Whitman's family had left and gone back to West Hills, leaving fourteen year old Walt alone in the city. Learning how to set

The Significance of Walt Whitman

810 words - 3 pages , Cuff, I give them the same, I receive them the same." - An excerpt of Songs of Myself by Walt Whitman- Stanza 6In this excerpt, Whitman can see the grass as a symbol of the continuity of the cycle of life, death and rebirth; the representation of an individual. The grass in a sense signifies regeneration in nature, as well. However, grass also signifies a common material that links everyone together, which is the perfect symbol of democracy

The Life of Walt Whitman: An Exploration in the Poet's Spirituality and Works.

2612 words - 10 pages the emotions established by the spider and bring them into the discussion of the narrator's soul. Gunther Muller goes farther in his piece “The Bridge to God” claiming that “in the very first line the spider is made the homo patiens”. To Muller “A Noiseless Patient Spider” also proves that “eternity and spirituality are interchangeable terms”. To Whitman grasping the infinite is the spiritual goal. The spider is Whitman's metaphor for his search

"Leaves of grass" and a biography of Walt Whitman

684 words - 3 pages Walt Whitman was a poet born right here in this very town, Huntington, New York. His house is now a museum that sits across the street from the Walt Whitman Mall. To honor Walt Whitman's greatness several of his poems from The Leaves of Grass have been engraved upon the walls of the mall. The life that Whitman led was a hard one, and his controversial poetry and ideas didn't help much either. Many people objected to his ideas and the themes of

Use of Metaphor, Symbols and Symbolism in The Great Gatsby

1327 words - 5 pages Use of Metaphor and Symbolism in The Great Gatsby       Some novels have more of an impact in modern society than when they were originally written. This is especially true with Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. Modern society can be termed corrupt, complete with tainted morals and an overemphasis on the acquisition of money and friends. Fitzgerald seeks the root of the problem and wants the reader to ponder whether he or she wants money and

Similar Essays

A Poem Analysis: "A Noiseless Patient Spider" By Walt Whitman

1640 words - 7 pages body, as wellas of nature, as a vehicle in this process, his method is similar to Emerson's.Using the spider-web metaphor suggested by Emerson, Whitman explainsin the last five lines of "A Noiseless Patient Spider" the situation of his ownpoetic soul and what that soul attempts to do. Whitman's poetic soul, like thespider stands isolated at the center of things. If it is to take on meaning, itmust, as Emerson put it, "come to a ripeness of

The Spider And Soul In Walt Whitman's A Noiseless Patient Spider

1340 words - 5 pages The Spider and Soul in Walt Whitman's A Noiseless Patient Spider Works Cited Not Included In “A Noiseless Patient Spider”, Walt Whitman compares the images of a spider creating a web to catch its prey to his own soul. In the first stanza, he describes the spider creating its web. In the second stanza, he begins to describe his own soul searching for something it needs. Throughout the poem, Whitman is relating the spider to the human

Imagery And Walt Whitman Essay

1656 words - 7 pages English poetry written on American soil. Whitman was one of the greatest poets of his time. Literary critic Harold Bloom states that, "No western poet, in the past century and a half, not even Browning, or Leopardi or Baudelaire, overshadows Walt Whitman". The literary tool of imagery in Whitman's poetry is what set him apart from other writers of the time.Imagery is defined by The Merriam-Webster Dictionary as language that causes people to

Use Of Imagery And Metaphor In Wilfred Owen's Dulce Et Decorum Est

1409 words - 6 pages Use of Imagery and Metaphor in Wilfred Owen's Dulce et Decorum Est        Through vivid imagery and compelling metaphors "Dulce et Decorum Est" gives the reader the exact feeling the author wanted. The poem is an anti-war poem by Wilfred Owen and makes great use of these devices. This poem is very effective because of its excellent manipulation of the mechanical and emotional parts of poetry. Owen's use of exact diction and vivid