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The Methods Used To Gain Unlimited Power In 1984 By George Orwell

1883 words - 8 pages

Every human being has natural rights that can never be taken away. In an attempt to create a world where every person if offered a fair opportunity to live life, the United Nations passed a bill called The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, in 1948. The document outlines the all the rights provided to everyone in the world, despite age, gender, religion etc. Civil liberties including, right to life, liberty and security of person; the right not to be subjected to arbitrary interference with his privacy, family or home; and right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion, are incorporated in the Declaration. Despite the positive moral of the implemented civil rights, there have been numerous instances when essential civil liberties have been taken away from innocent people. By taking away natural rights from other people, the offenders attain the desired power and control. In the book, 1984, George Orwell presents the idea of how the world would become if all natural rights seized to exist. The omnipresent ruler of Oceania, named Big Brother, seizes all the natural rights of the citizens, to gain unconstrained power over everything and everyone. Big Brother’s dominants the lives of the citizens by strongly executing the idea of ‘mind over matter’ or doublethink to control the minds of the people, by the creation of groundbreaking technology to control the actions of the citizens and by controlling and modifying the English spoken and written language to express authority over freedom of thought and speech. The combination of the three methods helps Big Brother to create a never-ending rein on the minds and hearts of the citizens of Oceania.
In Oceania, the concept of ‘mind over matter’ is the very foundation of the government, known as The Party. The government implements the idea of ‘mind over matter’, thought the word doublethink; the ability to believe two contradicting things at the same time. O’Brian, a faithful Party member, attempts to explain ‘mind over matter’, “Whatever the Party holds to be truth is truth. It is impossible to see reality except by looking at it through the eyes of the Party…. The party says that two plus two is five then that is the truth” (222). The party is the sole important existence in Oceania; the government-implemented law encourages that citizens must believe every piece of information that Big Brother supports, without question. The citizens control their minds and mold their memories to match Big Brothers; the entire process of controlling an individual’s mind is ‘mind over matter’. Doublethink, constructs reality for the people of Oceania, which is entirely planned by Big Brother. The Party believes that two plus two is five, and despite all the evidence contradicting the idea, every citizen alters reality in order to agree. Big Brother can disprove everything that the citizen imagine being reality, and modifies it into a world filled with illusions; he can recreate math, science and history...

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