The Pro Democracy Movement Of The 1980's

962 words - 4 pages

The Pro-Democracy Movement of the 1980's

Communism took over China soon after the second world war. Mao Zedong,
the leader of the communist party who came from the country, remained
paramount until his death on the 9th of September 1976. During his
rule, he modified Marxist-Lenonism to suit China's population of
peasants, and went through many "leaps" to try and revolutionise
China's economy as he had done with the political system. But in the
end, Millions of Chinese men, women and children died. When Mao
himself died after a life of stubborness and an apparent inability to
listen, Deng Xiaoping came into power even thought being exiled twice
before.

Deng Xiaoping, after seeing the errors of Mao's long rule, began to
introduce political and economic reforms to China. Politically, he
wanted to deal with leadership change, the constitution, dealing with
dissidents, more power for the state rather than local, changes of
area's and branches, and perhaps even village democracy. Economically,
Deng's reforms included going from stateplan to market mechanism's,
state intervention in science and technology, creating taxation,
labour market change and the four modernisations. The four
modernisations included changes in agriculture, industry, military and
science and technology. But even during this, Deng wanted to uphold
"Four Basic Principles" which were upholding the socialist road,
upholding the dictatorship of the proletariat, upholding the
leadership of the Communist Party and upholding the
Marxist-Leninist-Mao Zedong thought.

Despite the rapid changes that were occuring to China, the people of
China wanted more, the student's in particular. The student's of China
started to demand democracy, amongst other things, and began protests
to gain the governments attention. One of the first major problems
with the student mvoements was that they all had different views on
what they wanted, and all suggested different actions. The demands
were divided into four main issues
1. An end to political corruption
2. Better treatment of students and teachers
3. Free speech, freedom of press and demonstration rights
4. Political Reform, which is what the western media mainly focused
on.

But the problem the students were facing, was trying to get the
Chinese government to pay attention to their protests, and to force
the government to respond. The government seemed stubborn, treating
the students like mere children. Even though the students had
developed their own...

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