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The Problem Of Evil Essay

1556 words - 7 pages

My claim that we have evil in this world because of our libertarian freedom does not fully answer the notion of “the problem of evil”. Saying we have evil in this world is just like saying we have bad decisions in this world. Bad decisions just like evil do not have a form. Every decision that God makes is a good decision therefore God cannot do evil. Human beings initiated evil. In fact, the first human beings (Adam and Eve) gave ongoing birth to evil because everyone ultimately came from them. So everyone after Adam and Eve is inherently evil. This idea is evident in our lives because every human being has committed evil. The ultimate problem is not how an all-powerful God can exist while evil exist, the ultimate dilemma is how a holy God can accept human beings that are not holy. Stephen T. Davis in “Free Will and Evil” writes, “All the moral evil that exists in the world is due to the choices of free moral agents whom God created” (Davis). Davis argues that free will is the answer to the problem of evil. This is consistent with my view that evil exists because of our libertarian freedom. Unlike Hick, Davis is consistent with my answer for evil and he is also consistent with how evil is solved in regards to heaven and hell. Davis states, “I do believe hell exists, but I do not hold that it is a place where protesting people are led against their will to be tortured vengefully. I believe that the people who will end up separated from God freely choose hell and would be unhappy in God’s presence. Having lived their lives apart from God, they will choose eternally—to go on doing so. So it is not a bad thing that they do not spend eternity in the presence of God. People who will prove to be incorrigibly evil will never come to the point of desiring the beatific vision” (Davis). Michael Murray in “Heaven and Hell” gives a similar notion with what he calls the “Natural Consequence View”. He states, “ The second reason is that if those who lived lives in which they rejected God were nonetheless forced into God’s presence forever, such a life would be utterly odious to them. It would be like forcing one who hates opera to sit through Der Ring des Nibelungen for eternity” (Murray). Murray agrees with Davis in that people are not protesting they should have been in heaven but are at full knowledge they are deserving of hell. I also believe in the Natural Consequence view because I do think a person would feel some sort of regret in the being the state of hell that they are in. Murray states, “The NC view holds that the lost ones feels is the sort of loss felt by someone who recognizes that they are responsible for missing out on the highest in human fulfillment and happiness. Thus, a deep, eternal regret nags at the person who becomes a lover of self.” I think a deep conscious regret will be placed on every human being that encounters the horrors of hell. This regret is from finally seeing the true evil of living a life that is contrary to God. ...

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