The Queen And I Essay

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The queen and I - Sue Townsend

The Monarchy Has Been Dismantled; When a Republican party wins the General Election, their first act in power is to strip the royal family of their assets and titles and send them to live on a housing estate in the Midlands. Exchanging Buckingham Palace for a two-bedroomed semi in Hell Close (as the locals dub it), caviar for boiled eggs, servants for a social worker named Trish, the Queen and her family learn what it means to be poor among the great unwashed. But is their breeding sufficient to allow them to rise above their changed circumstance or deep down are they really just like everyone else?

2. HER WORK

2.7.PLOT SUMMARY OF "THE QUEEN AND I"

The central idea of this novel is brilliant. A republican party wins the election in April 1992 and its first action is the abolition of the royal throne. The Queen and her family have to vacate Buckingham Palace and are exiled to a dreadful council estate somewhere in the Midlands. There they have to cope with the hard life millions of their compatriots have been living for years.

Initially, the newly arrived ex-royals are rejected as "poshos" by their neighbours, tattooed criminals with high-heeled wives. Their integration is hampered by the problem of communication. The polished and lofty RP spoken by the Windsors appears to be unintelligible for the inhabitants of the estate. But soon the courageous ex-monarch and her clique are accepted in their neighbourhood. Most of them do their very best to adapt themselves to these surprisingly different circumstances. Especially the two young princes William and Harry are quick to integrate. In no time they become friends with the local children and take up the "horrible" grammar and defective spelling of these playmates. Furthermore, their language is far from improved at the local primary school where standards of education are incredibly low.

With a tinge of 'Schadenfreude' Townsend describes how the Queen joins the queue as an NHS patient and Social Security claimant. Nevertheless she depicts Elizabeth as a very brave woman who never gets down-hearted. Prince Charles also makes the best of a bad situation. He takes to gardening, grows a ponytail and fancies the neighbour woman. However, his enjoyable life comes to an end when he is, by accident, imprisoned for assaulting a policeman. Princess Anne also copes. She dates the local handyman and aspires to become a do-it-yourself expert. Even the Queen's dog integrates well. After a short period of obstinate fasting it joins a pack of mongrels, commanded by an Alsatian suitably named King. Diana, like the dog, first passes through a difficult period but once she has forgotten her 70,000 £ Mercedes and falls in love with the relatively rich son of their Jamaican neighbour she too settles down.

Three members of the family,...

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