The Readings Of The Apology Of Socrates And Crito

1527 words - 6 pages

The Readings of The Apology of Socrates and Crito

Throughout the readings of The Apology of Socrates and Crito I have found that Socrates was not a normal philosopher. It is the philosopher's intention to question everything, but Socrates' approach was different then most other philosophers. From one side of the road, Socrates can be seen as an insensitive, arrogant man. He did indeed undermine the laws so they fit his ideals, leave his family, and disregard the people's values. On the other side he can be seen as an ingenious man who questioned what many thought was the unquestionable. As he can be criticized for disregarding the many's ideals he can also be applauded for rising above the daily ways of popular thought. He questioned the laws that he thought were wrong and, to his death, never backed down in what he believed in. People may see that as stupidity or as heroism, the beauty of it is that either way people saw it, Socrates wouldn't care.
Socrates lived in a political system. In order for someone to survive in a political system, it is helpful to obey the laws of the system, or city. Did Socrates follow these laws? According to the facts, no. He was indeed put to death because he broke them. But when looking at Crito, I wonder if he even intended or noticed the laws he broke to deserve him death. In Crito, Socrates follows the laws and does not escape, as recommended. If he was such a criminal to deserve death, why didn't he escape? Socrates viewed the laws with his own reference. It is obvious that he does not see any law being broken such as corrupting the youth. If he did see this crime take place I think he would not of defended himself. Socrates was a proud man, even though he did not show it. If he was accused of a crime and he knew he did it, I believe he would live up to it. I believe this because of his actions in Crito. He knows that if he escaped, it would be a crime. I find it ironic that he would argue his trial, but not argue his punishment from the trial he argued. The bottom line with Socrates and laws is that he probably did not live by them very closely. It is my belief that Socrates was a good person with good morals. He probably saw laws for the weak minded, and he was certain he was not weak minded. The question of whether he would abide by these laws is that he would and he did. He died for them.
A curious question to consider about Socrates is "What is the value of family?" To me, it seems like it is not his first priority. Socrates did indeed leave his family behind. Instead of sacrificing his mind and body to the city for his family, which is as common today as it was then, he sacrificed himself for himself. So who is nobler? The family man, who lives for the love of his family, or Socrates, who lived for himself. Many issues come to thought. One, was Socrates a family man? No, I think not. Two, did he die for his pride or to follow the laws? Can't answer that...

Find Another Essay On The Readings of The Apology of Socrates and Crito

Women in the Apology of Socrates

1404 words - 6 pages Women in the Apology of Socrates The most striking thing about women in the Apology of Socrates is their absence from where we might expect them. Only two specific women are mentioned: 1) the Pythia, the priestess of Apollo, who answers Chaerephon's question that no one is wiser than Socrates (21a); and 2) Thetis, the mother of Achilles (who himself is not mentioned by name but only referred to as the "son of Thetis"), who warns him

Recounting the Last Days of Socrates in Crito

1386 words - 6 pages Recounting the Last Days of Socrates in Crito In the Last Days of Socrates the dialogue “Crito” recounts Socrates last days before his execution. Socrates had been accused of corrupting the youth and not worshipping the Gods of the state. During his trial he denied all accusations and attempted to defend himself by proving his innocence using reason . He was judged to be guilty and given a death sentence. His long time friend Crito proposes

Socrates in the Apology

1022 words - 4 pages At the beginning of the Apology when Socrates is sentenced to death, he welcomed the idea and not once did he try to withdrawal from the punishment. Socrates refused to change his way of living, and thinking, and the only way for everyone to get him to cease would be through death. During the time of the sentencing, Socrates remained cool, calm, and collected with courage. He declared that at his age of 70, he never once feared death. Socrates

A Critique of Socrates' Guilt in the Apology

1133 words - 5 pages that needed to be disposed of for the elites to remain the power-holders in society.List of Works CitedPlato. 'The Apology of Socrates.' West, Thomas G. and West, Grace Starry, eds. Plato and Aristophanes: Four Texts on Socrates. Itacha, NY: Cornell University Press, 1984.1Plato, 'The Apology of Socrates,' Thomas G. West and Grace Starry West, eds., Plato and Aristophanes: Four Texts on Socrates. (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1984), s.19c, p.66.2Ibid, s.29a/32d, p.80/p.85.3Ibid, s.28b, p.79.4Ibid, s.25e, p.75.5Ibid, s.26a, p.75.

Socrates Argument in the Crito

1118 words - 4 pages Introduction Socrates argues in the Crito that he shouldn't escape his death sentence because it isn't just. Crito is distressed by Socrates reasoning and wishes to convince him to escape since Crito and friends can provide the ransom the warden demands. If not for himself, Socrates should escape for the sake of his friends, sons, and those who benefit from his teaching. Socrates and Crito's argument proceeds from this point. As an aside, I

Plato's account of Socrates Apology

2091 words - 9 pages Plato's account of Socrates' Apology In Plato's account of Socrates' apology, Socrates is brought to trial on the charges that he corrupted the youth of Athens through his teachings, and that he did not believe in the gods that the state believed in. Throughout the account, the argument against him comes across as unreliable and biased. Therefore, Socrates is innocent of the charges laid against him by Meletus, Anytus, and Lycon due to the

The National Apology of 2008

1732 words - 7 pages Intro: 50-80 words The National Apology of 2008 is the latest addition to the key aspects of Australia’s reconciliation towards the Indigenous owners of our land. A part of this movement towards reconciliation is the recognition of Indigenous Australians and Torres Strait Islanders rights to their land. Upon arrival in Australia, Australia was deemed by the British as terra nullius, land belonging to no one. This subsequently meant that

Tarot, the meaning of tarot readings.

1523 words - 6 pages readings are a common way of discovering our inner selves, and searching for meaning in our pasts, presents, or futures. We are an inpatient society, seeking instant gratification and answers. Tarot offers a look into the hidden realms of life. You only see and find what you already know but Tarot somehow makes it all become clearer to us.Tarot cards are a means of predicting events or receiving guidance in both our inner (spiritual) and outer

The Biography of Socrates

1502 words - 6 pages the Apology, the Crito, and the Phaedo. The Examined Life Because of his political associations with an earlier regime, the Athenian democracy put Socrates on trial, charging him with undermining state religion and corrupting young people. The speech he offered in his own defense, as reported in Plato's (Apology), provides us with many reminders of the central features of Socrates' approach to philosophy and its relation to practical life

The Trial of Socrates

983 words - 4 pages Socrates was accused of being a sophist because he was "engaging in inquiries into things beneath the earth and in the heavens, of making the weaker argument appear the stronger," and "teaching others these same things." (Apology, Plato, Philosophic Classics page 21) Socrates is also accused of denying the existence of the gods, and corrupting the youth. Socrates goes about trying to prove his innocence. The jury that Socrates was tried by

The Trial of Socrates

1100 words - 4 pages hypocrisy. It is this hypocrisy that makes the trial and death of Socrates quite ironic. Athens, the city in which Socrates resided, was a free democratic city that was governed by all citizens in a fair democracy as seen in apology. It was said to be an association of free men with no single leader or king. The town prided itself on the freedom of its citizens and, especially, its freedom of speech. Most all citizens prided themselves on these

Similar Essays

Apology And The Crito Comparison Essay

857 words - 3 pages Apology and the Crito Comparison Socrates was a great thinker and debater dedicated to truth. He spent his golden years walking the streets of Athens in pursuit of wisdom. Socrates lived the destiny that was revealed to him in the Oracle. He created and perfected his own cross-examination technique; we today know it as the Socratic Method. He was thorough and unrelenting. His subjects were often humiliated. Socrates would methodically

Plato’s Crito: The Last Days Of Socrates

1480 words - 6 pages , his death will reflect poorly on Crito. The people will think that Crito did nothing to save his friend. If Socrates is worried about the risk or the financial cost to Crito; it’s an expense that he is willing to pay, and that he made arrangements for Socrates to live a life of exile in a pleasant manner. The next argument that Crito pleads to Socrates is that, if he stays, he would be helping his enemies in their injustices, and in turn would

The Function Of The Quest Or Journey Motif In The Apology And The Crito

1274 words - 6 pages The quest, in the classical era to the modern notions of the word has meant a coming of age or to notions of learning where at the beginning there was nothing known. The quest in its very nature is a search to find an answer, an artifact of power and wealth or perhaps even for peace; in the platonic dialogues they play a crucial role in the Apology of Socrates and the Crito. The Apology in the trial and death of Socrates is an example of a quest

The Apology Of Socrates: Guilty Or Innocent?

954 words - 4 pages The Apology of Socrates: Guilty or Innocent?    In any case of law, when considering truth and justice, one must first look at the validity of the court and the system itself.  In Socrates' case, the situation is no different.  One may be said to be guilty or innocent of any crime, but guilt or innocence is only as valid as the court it is subjected to.  Therefore, in considering whether Socrates is guilty or not, it must be kept in mind