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The Realism Of The Film The Battle Of The Somme

1904 words - 8 pages

The Realism of the Film The Battle of The Somme

The film 'The Battle of The Somme' was released in Londonon the 10th
of August 1916, it was a famous documentary that was filmed by
Geoffrey Malins and J.B. McDowell. They were one of the first groups
of cameramen to film the British soldiers on the Battlefields of the
Western Front. They helped the government to produce a video, to show
people that War wasn't as bad as it seemed. It was however a silent
film and so captions had to be use to explain what the next section of
the film was going to show. The film gave us an insight into what the
life of a soldier would be like. Many historians have argued over
whether this video is an accurate and reliable source of information
and hopefully this will be resolved.

The film however may not be reliable and trustworthy because the shots
may have been fixed and set-up, they were also the opinions of only
one person, so if they felt that everything was great, this would then
show in what they took pictures of. The government could also have
only selected the views that they wanted for the film so they may have
left out the gory bits and pictures showing the British Forces
suffering.

The way that the film portrays Equipment and Supplies can be supported
by many of the sources, the sources suggest that the British had
plenty of food and drink, they also show the British with high stacks
of boxes full of food and drink. Some of the sources also imply that
they had plenty of artillery and shells, so that they didn't run out
during mid-battle, they also had a lot of guns and men ready to shoot
the Germans. However, other sources challenge the images shown in the
film. Some sources suggest that at times during the War some of the
soldiers went starved for a couple of days. For example some cartoons
show that the army had bad rations and also that they didn't have
enough food. In addition various sources imply that food was often
stolen because soldiers were so hungry. Overall I feel that the
evidence clearly indicates that the film provides quite a realistic
view of the amount of Equipment and Supplies because more sources
agree that the British had enough supplies and plenty of firearms.
However Cartoons may not have been a good reliable source because they
were used to make fun out of the situations.

The way that the film portrays Trench conditions can be supported by
several of the sources, the sources suggest that the British trenches
were comfortable and the Photographs show that the soldiers were
enjoying themselves. For example the source gathered from Photographs
shows us that the troops were happy, comfortable and importantly
enjoying themselves. Some sources also imply that soldiers were having
more happy times in the trenches than elsewhere. However, other
sources challenge...

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