The Red Tent, By Anita Diamant

2674 words - 11 pages

Since the advent of ordered civilization, patriarchal rule has held dominion over the kingdoms of men. Women have had equally as many influential, inspirational and imperative tales to be told as men, however their voices have been marginalized, neglected, iniquitously subjugated, and bound by the ineffable chains of bondage for centuries. One need only possess a cursory knowledge of biblical history to recognize immediately the lowly status of women in the ancient Hebrew world. There is nary a better sourcebook of patriarchy and the proscriptive treatment of women in all of literature than that of the Old Testament. One cannot possibly, however, ignore the stories of Delilah, of Sarah, of Jezebel, and, perhaps most interestingly, of Dinah. Anita Diamant, a contemporary chronicler of Jewish lore and a seminal figure in modern-day historical fiction, expressed the woes and voicelessness experienced by the women of the Old Testament in her novelistic midrash entitled The Red Tent. Narrated from Dinah's perspective, Diamant's novel presents a feministic interpretation and retelling of the story of Dinah, her mothers, and her sisters. Dinah's life in the Book of Genesis is relegated to just a few ambiguous sentences, since she was a woman and the principle authors of the Bible were men with their own bigoted agendas. Had Dinah been given the opportunity to share her story, trials and tribulations, and actual experiences, her account would have doubtlessly been different from that which is commonly accepted. As evidenced by the stories of Dinah, Mary Magdalene, and any number of marginalized genders, religions, and ethnic groups, those who maintain power write history, eclipsing the perspectives of the powerless and the weak and crushing their souls and cultures by means of rendering them voiceless, silent, and burdened with memories they cannot relate.
The most pertinent character in Diamant's historiographic, proto-feministic rendering of women's roles in biblical times is that of Dinah, the novel's narrator and protagonist. The Red Tent chronicles the hardships and pilgrimages that she and her family endured in depth, emphasizing the gender solidarity betwixt the women of the period. The Bible, however, consigns Dinah's life to a meager few lines. The Book of Genesis' description of Dinah and her circumstances is minimal, indefinite, and wholly hazy. According to the first book of the Bible, Dinah "went out to see the daughters of the land" (Genesis 34:1), though her reasoning for doing so is left, as it would seem, deliberately unclear. It is evident that little attention is paid to Dinah's activities, desires, goals, personality, or motives for travelling to the city of King Hamor the Hivite. In a general sense, the fact that the text remains suspiciously silent regarding Dinah as an individual signifies the biased perspective from which the story is related. As Diamant's novel explores, Dinah was a three-dimensional individual, rather than a...

Find Another Essay On The Red Tent, by Anita Diamant

Anita Desai's "Village by the Sea": Chapter 1, part 1

1711 words - 7 pages The first chapter of Village by the sea uses a technique called the 'Adverb of time'; this is when the whole scene follows a certain order from first to next. The effect of this is to give the reader a picture of the whole day in the village. The whole of the first chapter focuses on depicting the life of Hari's family; this is a stereotype of the village. They are similar to the 'voice of the village', as most of the other villagers are either

"The Red Convertible" By Louise Erdrich

654 words - 3 pages Autumn JohnsonMs. ChitaphongEnglish 318, March 2014 "The Red Convertible" By Louise ErdrichThroughout 'The Red Convertible," Louise Erdrich develops three major characters in the story who play a role in foreshadowing its tragic and dramatic ending. The three characters are Henry, Lyman and the red convertible.On page 114 Henry says to Lyman, "Got to cool me off". Henry then proceeds to jump in the river. He foreshadows what's going to happen to

"The Red Convertible" by Louse Erdrich

618 words - 2 pages When a reader hears the title, "The Red Convertible", he/she thinks; summer, road trips, and driving fast on the open roads. However, this is the story about a man that is mentally damaged by the events of the war, and also how it effects his whole family. Henry was a happy, loving, and sane man before being drafted, but when he came back he was a completely different person. The war effected Henry in a way that many of our soldiers were

The Red Room by H.G. Wells

2376 words - 10 pages The Red Room by H.G. Wells The title 'The Red Room' immediately attracts the reader's attention; it is symbolic but leaves unanswered questions. ?What is the red room?? Is this room dangerous? Overall the title raises so much curiosity wanting us to read on and find answers to our questions. Red is a very strong colour and is generally associated with blood, danger, warning, hell, and above all, fear, the title also shows the setting

The Red Death by Edgar Allan Poe

1527 words - 7 pages Edgar Allan Poe describes , in this story , the arrival of a tragic plague : the black death . The characters in this story are the Prince Prospero and his guests, invited by him in his palace to try to escape the disease ; protagonist but perhaps the greater the mask of the red death . "The Red Death had long devastated the country . No pestilence had ever been so fatal , or so hideous . Blood was ITS Avatar and Its seal "                   The

The Red Curtain Trilogy by Baz Lurhmann

1998 words - 8 pages The Red Curtain Trilogy by Baz Lurhmann On The Red Curtain Trilogy, which were all directed by Baz Lurhmann, all of the films began with red curtains opening up like in a theatre to 'reveal' the film. In 'Strictly Ballroom' the scene opens with silhouettes of the main characters dancing, waiting for a performance to start (?) then walking excitedly onto screen which starts the movie. For 'Romeo & Juliet' the

The Red Convertible by Louise Erdrich

1356 words - 5 pages PTSD, also known as Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, can cause change and bring about pain and stress in many different forms to the families of the victims of PTSD. These changes can be immense and sometimes unbearable. PTSD relates to the characters relationship as a whole after Henry returns from the army and it caused Henry and Lyman’s relationship to crumble. The Red Convertible that was bought in the story is a symbol of their brotherhood

The Red Room by H.G. Wells

4124 words - 16 pages The Red Room by H.G. Wells During the Victorian period, readers became engrossed with gothic horror and psychologically thrilling literature. Subsequently making these genres to be among one of the most read story lines; it has remained a popular genre since. H. G. Wells wrote science-fiction novels such as 'The first men in the moon', but he also created 'The Red Room', written in 1894, which was based on Gothic

The Red Convertible, by Louise Erdich

1166 words - 5 pages It is said that when a man returns from war he is forever changed. In the short story, “The Red Convertible,” Louise Erdrich demonstrates these transformations through the use of symbolism. Erdrich employs the convertible to characterize the emotional afflictions that war creates for the soldier and his family around him by discussing the pre-deployment relationship between two brothers Henry and Lyman, Lyman's perception of Henry upon Henry's

The Red Convertible by Louise Erdrich

982 words - 4 pages The beginning of the story is a preview to the night Henry died. “We owned it together until his boots filled with water on a windy night and he bought out my share. Lyman walks everywhere he goes” (1882). Since Lyman now walks everywhere that means that he no longer has the car. The car was very symbolic to the story, it even gave the brothers a bond. They went everywhere together in that red convertible. They bonded by the trips they took over

The red room by H.G Wells

998 words - 4 pages The Red Room is a 'spine chiller' written by H.G Wells. The story is set at Lorraine Castle where a specific room is preoccupied by ghastly spirits. This story The Red Room is about a man (narrator) who seeks spirits inside Lorraine Castle, with his only protection as his revolver. The spirit welcomes the man in an uncomfortable manner, moving furniture, candles going out without smoke and other procedures which the spirit posses. His excuse for

Similar Essays

Book Analysis Of "The Red Tent", By Anita Diamant

1021 words - 4 pages , "The Red Tent" by Anita Diamant, the word no has no real meaning at all. "The Red Tent" retells the story as the coming together of two cultures and the desire of a woman to find love. Dinah was not raped, but Dinah had intercourse and later intermarried, showing no caution she allowed herself to be swept off her feet, blindly guided by her heart and her love.The tent in this story, and where the book depicts its name is very important, not only as

The Red Tent By Diamant Essay

1729 words - 7 pages The Red Tent by Diamant In Diamant’s powerful novel The Red Tent the ever-silent Dinah from the 34th chapter of Gensis is finally given her own voice, and the story she tells is a much different one than expected. With the guiding hands of her four “mothers”, Leah, Rachel, Zilpah, and Bilhah, all the wives of Jacob, we grow with Dinah from her childhood in Mesoptamia through puberty, where she is then entered into the “red tent”, and well

"The Red Tent" Infuses A Woman's Blood With Power

1915 words - 8 pages different in many important ways. The rape becomes a love affair. Author Anita Diamant explains, "I could never reconcile the story of Genesis 34 with a rape, because the prince does not behave like a rapist! After the prince is said to have "forced" her (a determination made by the brothers, not by Dinah), he falls in love with her, asks his father to get Jacob's permission to marry her, and then agrees to the extraordinary, even grotesque demand

Themes Of The Village By The Sea By Anita Desai

863 words - 3 pages Themes of The Village by the Sea by Anita Desai The novel, 'the village by the sea' by Anita Desai is about how Hari and Lila struggle for the survival of their family in the absence of their drunken father and ill mother. As portrayed in the beginning of the novel, the opening scene is described to be an unstable environment. This is reflected by the setting of the waves and how they are portrayed to be 'unstable' as the author uses