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The Relevance And Authority Of Scripture

1158 words - 5 pages

The relevance and authority of scripture from three different viewpoints first evangelical with its strong emphasis on the Word of God it left little room to advance with the ever changing culture. Second the Liberal movement was all about cultural relevance and used only as a record of history. Each holds a valid argument Neo-Orthodox however is a good blend of both cultural relevance and scriptural foundation.
The Issues
Evangelical
Evangelicalism carried a strong emphasis on the Word of God. Which is in its own right a positive to the movement. Bible is used as the center of the Christian faith, however where they went wrong was saying that God is not moving anymore and what we have in this book is all that there is. There is no need for any more revelation because the Bible is complete. Actions will be based on the foundations of the Scriptures and things that do not directly align with this scriptures will not be tolerated. The evangelical movement held to the truth that the Bible is the authoritative Word of God. However, aloud no room for experiential or cultural relevance of the Bible. They did believe that the Bible was “the only infallible, authoritative Word of God” (qtd. in “Church History”) the evangelical movement joined people together out of other random religions and formed a cohesive bond between churches.
Liberal
Friedrich Schleiermacher believed that a person’s private revelations of God took precedence over their revelations from Scripture. Schleiermacher claimed the Bible was nothing more than a record of others’ religious experiences, as opposed to the inspired Word of God (Lane 238) He taught that one’s experiences and feelings brought about the religious aspects of today. There external sources employed, were allowed to even challenge the church’s traditional biblically based claims (Lane 239) He was not a follower of Jesus Christ because Friedrich Schleiermacher believed that Jesus was the most religious person that ever lived. They degraded the authority and importance of the Holy Scriptures keeping Christianity relevant to a changing society, even at the expense of its traditional practices this was the premise of the liberal movement. Friedrich Schleiermacher believed that a person’s private revelations of God took precedence over their revelations from Scripture.
Neo-Orthodox
Neo-Orthodox was established immediately after World War 1 by Karl Barth and Emil Brunner, it directly opposed the liberal movement. It said that experience is not everything, you must have the foundation of the Bible. The main focus was on the gospel message which the Bible relayed, not on the book itself (Lane 271) Neo-Orthodox stands on the fact that sin is imamate and only God can free one from sin. Karl Barth, the forerunner of Neo-Orthodox thought, viewed the Bible not as a history book or instructional for doctrine (2 Tim 2:15), but as a constantly changing event that spoke to the heart of humanity (Lane 274)

The Implications
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