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The Consequences Of Drilling In The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

1062 words - 4 pages

When Americans fill their tanks with gasoline, two questions come to mind: “How can we save money and why is gasoline extremely expensive? Due to the traumatizing events that occurred in 2008, when gas prices exceeded four dollars per gallon, fear and insecurity came upon many concerning the future increase on gasoline prices. As a result of the aforementioned events, oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildfire has been a constant political debate in the United States. America imports its gasoline from different countries due to the scarcity of resources, but these exporting countries are unvaryingly raising their prices on these barrels of crude oil and natural gas liquids to an extent that negatively affects the economy. This crucial issue has caused the Republican Party to support the drilling in the Arctic National Wildfire Refuge. However, the Democratic Party disagrees and argues with the fact that drilling in the Arctic Refuge may create an insignificant result since it would only be a temporary solution as opposed to a long term benefit. In compliance with the Democratic Party’s notion, the citizens of the world must oppose the oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildfire Refuge because of the unnecessary damage that will be created, the insignificant result, and different alternatives to the issue.

If the United States decides to drill for oil in the Arctic National Wildfire Refuge, it could result in irreparable damage to one of the most significant environments in the United States. The Arctic National Wildfire Refuge is the most insubstantial ecosystem in the world that also provides habitation to a various selection of wildlife. The resulting damage will not only severely destruct the land but also harm the species surviving on the Arctic National Wildfire. There are a numerous amount of species living in these nineteen million acres that will be forced to suffer consequences out of their hands such as the polar, grizzly, and black bears, caribou, muskoxen, wolves, sheep, red foxes, wolverines, marine mammals, millions of migratory birds, and many more. Therefore, by drilling for oil in this national treasure we would willingly sacrifice and jeopardized the lives of many innocent creatures. The obvious detrimental outcome will lead us back to the remaining question: Is it really worth it to assault this national treasure for a short term solution? Unfortunately, immense oil companies will manipulate us to believe that the only solution is more drilling. And since President George W. Bush’s administration implemented the drill more policy, there has been a two hundred and fifty percent increase on gas (Defenders of Wildlife). Consequently, it is safe to conclude that drilling more is not the solution to reduce gas prices, but instead, the cause of a bigger problem.

In the event that the Unites States does decide to drill in the Arctic National Wildfire Refuge, it will inform the oil market about how serious we are...

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