This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

The Effects Of Green Revolution In The 70's

874 words - 4 pages

The Green Revolution began during the 1970s and 1980s, in an attempt to increase the nutrition in food crops and to make species of food crops more uniform and robust. Scientists developed strains of hybrid plants, such as wheat, rice, and maize that quantitatively produced more food that was of better quality. This research was led by Dr. Norman Borlaug in Mexico and others under the sponsorship of the Rockefeller Foundation during the 1960s.
There were several techniques that the scientists used to help increase yield and appearance of crops. First, genetic engineering was used, such as cross breeding plants for desirable qualities. Other methods were also used, such as expensive fertilizers, irrigation, heavy machinery, and pesticides and herbicides. These techniques were all used together to dramatically increase the yield of crops in many different third world countries, whose population was increasing at the fastest rate.
The Green Revolution was an influence and a disappointment to some people that it affect the most. It affected society, agriculture, and new technology. The wheat yield increased over time. As that was happening population grew and failure occurred. From land being dead tired to new technology, where it was easy to get fast money. Although the Green Revolution was started to end world hunger and the disparity in developing countries, it caused other consequences which included population growth and changes in genetic diversity of certain plants and cultural lifestyles. This revolution introduced the use of new technology and many scientifically altered crops to the world. With the rise in food supply, the population increased and some countries weren’t as starving as before. But with the advancement in technology and crop varieties, the environment and some societies suffered. Before the revolution, many countries were miserable. Without enough food supply to feed their people, the populations were vulnerable to disease and could be a threat to more successful areas.
Significance of the Problem
Some of the problems of green Revolution are: The effect of Green. revolution primarily have been felt on food grains including wheat, rice, jowar, bajra, maize and production of these crops have gone high. But it has wrested areas form coarse cerials, pulses and oilseeds. The Green Revolution technology has given birth to growing disparities in economic development. It has so far affected only 40% of the total cropped area and 60% is still untouched by it. The green revolutions also have effected to only effect to only those areas which were already better from agricultural point of view. The Green Revolution has created widespread unemployment among agricultural labourers in rural areas and the worst hit are the poor and the landless people.
Agriculture under Green...

Find Another Essay On The Effects of Green Revolution in the 70's

The Green Revolution Essay

1237 words - 5 pages only 40 years to reach 2 billion in 2000. The success of the green revolution technology is greatly lauded and is still evident today. However, along with accompanying success, was tremendous increase in the use of pesticides. Wilson also reported that pesticides used in Sri Lanka increased from 59 metric tons in 1970 to 6742 metric tons in 1995. Although these pesticides used then and now are useful for killing pests (insect, weed, microbes that

Effects of Technology in the 1940’s

1079 words - 5 pages The 40’s were best known for World War II, but did you know that Velcro was invented during this time period? In the 1940’s, technological changes occurred with their effects being both positive and negative, but these effects have benefited society more by being the basis of many things used today. The technology in the 1940’s had undergone many changes. Some of the changes in technology were that the first US jet plane was flown . Also, the

Apple´s Development of the Green Laser

822 words - 4 pages Five years ago, Apple (AAPL) design guru Jony Ive decided he wanted a new feature for the next MacBook: a small dot of green light above the screen, shining through the computer’s aluminum casing to indicate when its camera was on. The problem? It’s physically impossible to shine light through metal. Ive called in a team of manufacturing and materials experts to figure out how to make the impossible possible, according to a former employee

Effects of the Industrial Revolution

871 words - 4 pages populaces. The Industrial Revolution extensively changed daily life of the 18th and 19th century through technological advancements, changes in society, and population changes. One of the greatest effects of the Industrial Revolution was technological advancements. Inventions such as the flying shuttle, spinning jenny, and power loom rewarded pioneering nations with prestige and technological superiority (Rogers). English iron purification

Effects of the Industrial Revolution

1319 words - 5 pages their empires. It was now more possible than ever that they will succeed in westernizing all of the colonies that fall under their rule. In retrospect, without the industrial revolution, mankind would be ultimately “lost” in every aspect of our societies. All of the advancements in transportation, trade, the economy, supply and demand and even our basic ideologies of modern life ultimately stem out of the effects of the industrial revolution.

Effects of the Sugar Revolution

1939 words - 8 pages CARIBBEAN EXAMINATIONS COUNCILCARIBBEAN SECONDARY EDUCATION CERTIFICATESBA RESEARCH PROJECTSubject: Caribbean HistoryProficiency: GeneralExamination Year: 2013Name: Trey CumberbatchStudent ID#:Centre: Alexandra SchoolCentre #: 030001Topic: How did the Sugar Revolution affect life in the West Indies?Teacher: Mr. R.G. ClarkeCONTENTSPART ONE: PREVIEWRationale 3Introduction 4PART TWO: DEMOGRAPHICChanges In the Makeup of the Population 5Diagram

The Dance Revolution of the 1970’s

817 words - 3 pages The Dance Revolution of the 1970’s Contact improvisation is a modern dance form where two people move while maintaining a connection. It originated from portions of Steve Paxton’s movement studies, which he began in 1972 at Oberlin College. As with every major event that happens in the world, the introduction and investigation of contact improvisation affected everyone in society one way or another. Many people

The Automobile Revolution of the 1920’s

1272 words - 5 pages happened at the end of the Greatest Generation (“Generation Timelines Starting with the 1920’s”; poetic_lala), the Automobile Revolution. The ‘Automobile Revolution’ massively impacted the United States, from environmental issues all the way to how people lived their everyday lives. (“1920’s”; Wikipedia) During the twenties a major technological revolution had come forth into the spotlight, Henry Ford’s assembly line. The widely acclaimed assembly line

The Automobile Revolution of the 1920’s

1115 words - 5 pages at the end of the Greatest Generation (Generation Timelines Starting with the 1920’s; poetic_lala), the Automobile Revolution. The ‘Automobile Revolution’ massively impacted the United States, from environmental issues all the way to how people lived their everyday lives. During the twenties a major technological revolution had come forth into the spotlight, Henry Ford’s assembly line. The widely acclaimed assembly line allowed for

The Effects of Music in the 1920’s

1269 words - 6 pages leisure time the rich had to enjoy music. In conclusion studies have shown how music affects people psychologically, physically and these changes are accurately portrayed in the 1920’s. Works Cited "1923 - Charleston Dance Becomes Popular." About.com 20th Century History. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 Dec. 2013. "The Effects of Music on Emotional Response, Brand Attitude, and Purchase Intent in an Emotional Advertising Condition." By Jon D. Morris and Mary

Why Do Fewer Women Subscribe To The Idea That They Are Feminists In 2003 Than Was The Case In The 70's And Early 80's?

1921 words - 8 pages Why do fewer women subscribe to the idea that they arefeminists in 2003 than may have been the case inthe 70's and early 80's.Within this essay I will be identifying the reasons why many women are reluctant to call themselves feminists. I will look at the ideas and opinions of feminists such as Natasha Walter, Katherine Viner, Germaine Greer and Imelda Whelehan in order to answer the question and hope to successfully show why there has been a

Similar Essays

Culture And Music Of The 70's

2639 words - 11 pages Culture and Music of the 70's Music is an outlet to all aspects of life and culture is a significant way of forming people and the way they live. Although not always seen directly culture has an overbearing influence on the music that is produced and made popular. The political Climate of the early seventies was full of fire with issues such as Vietnam and constant protest throughout the county. Later in the 70’s the end of the

Influence Of The Media In The Anti War Movement Of The 60's And 70's

2121 words - 8 pages During his testimony to the Senate Committee of Foreign Relations, John Kerry mentioned that in his opinion, “there is nothing in South Vietnam which could have happened that realistically threatens the United States of America.” In that same testimony, Kerry discussed that most people “did not even know the difference between communism and democracy. They only wanted to work in rice paddies without helicopters strafing them and bombs with

How Did Pittsburg Go From Being Bad In The Early 70's To Being One Of The Best Teams Within The Late 70's

2201 words - 9 pages Chowan University How did Pittsburgh go from being bad in the early 70’s to be one of the best teams within the late 70’s? Adam Lee Kerns IDS 495B Dr. Danny Moore April 6, 2014 How did Pittsburgh go from being bad in the early 70’s to be one of the best teams within the late 70’s? We want to see how the change in record went from being bad to great. With this at hand we have to look at the team’s roster within the 70’s to see if it

Strikes Of The 70's And 80's: The Invisible Role Of Women

2586 words - 10 pages Strikes of the 70's and 80's: The Invisible Role of Women Throughout history women have slowly moved from the role of mother and housewife into the labor force. In the middle of this rise in stature is a relatively unknown set of events that helped women gain the self-respect and individual attitude needed to move up in the work force. Women's participation in strikes during the 1970's and 80's is relatively unknown in U.S. history. Although