The Consequences Of Hurricane Katrina Essay

2304 words - 9 pages

Hurricane Katrina hit the southern coast of the United States on August 28, 2005. The center of Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans on the morning of August 29, 2005. The devastating effect of this hurricane resulted in more than 1,800 citizens losing their lives, as well as more than an estimated $81 billion dollars in damages occurred. By August 31, 2005, eighty-percent of the city became submerged under water because the storm surge breached the city's levees at multiple points. If the levees are damaged massive water will flood Louisiana from the Gulf Coast, the Mississippi River, and other surrounding bodies of water. Some areas of New Orleans were 15 feet under water. Winds of Hurricane Katrina reached an astounding category 3 as it passed through downtown New Orleans; however, it felt as if it were category 5 winds. Tens of thousands of victims held on to roof-tops for their lives and scattered to shelters during and after the hurricane. In Southeast Louisiana, ninety- percent of its citizens were evacuated in the most successful way in our nations history. However, the elderly and the poor remained in the area. Those who did not evacuate obtained shelter in the Louisiana Superdome. Also, those who did not leave there homes had to swim for there lives through deep waters or remained trapped in their attics or rooftops. The national disaster of Hurricane Katrina resulted in long-lasting consequences for the citizens of New Orleans, mainly which the society will never completely recover from; Social Consequences, Economic Consequences, and Environmental Consequences.
The devastation of Hurricane Katrina led to one of the most severe humanities in our nations history. There are many social consequences including; racial, criminal, displacement issues, health issues, and animal issues.
Moreover, Hurricane Katrina can be seen more narrowly, as a disaster that disproportionately afflicted the poor, black inhabitants of New Orleans. Past research demonstrates a large racial divide in support of issues with clear racial overtones and we examine the possibility of a racial divide in reactions to Katrina using data from a national telephone survey of white and black Americans. Some find that there is a large different in racial sympthanys for the victims of Hurrican Katrina, how fast the government responded to urgency of attention for the victims, and support for proposed solutions to mend hurricane-ravaged New Orleans, verifying the racial nature of the disaster. Blacks viewed the hurricane victims more positively than did whites, drew a sharper distinction and held more sympathetic feelings for those stranded than evacuated from New Orleans, and were substantially more supportive of government efforts to improve the situation of hurricane victims and rebuild New Orleans. This racial gap is as large as any observed in recent polls, holds up even after controlling for education, income and other possible racial differences, and documents...

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