The Rise Of Anxiety Disorder Essay

1490 words - 6 pages

As the world leaps into the future, it seems that mental illness is becoming more of a problem among many people. One of the most common types of illness's among the current population is anxiety disorders. It is evident that there is a rise of anxiety disorder among the Western World. There are three main factors that contribute to this, they include our education system, technology and media, and the treatment and decreasing criticism anxiety patients receive.
In recent years, it has become a well noted fact that the education system has become in many ways tougher, for better or for worse. Nevertheless, for anyone susceptible to an anxiety disorder, school often aggravates their symptoms. Today over 10 per-cent of European and American citizens suffer from an anxiety disorder, and it is an even greater number among young people (Points of View: FEAR NOT). As English-speaking countries move forward through time, testing becomes more stressful and more competitive, it should be expected that anxiety will increase. As well, according to Psychology Today the “[a]verage high school student [in the United States] has the same level of anxiety as the average psychiatric patient in the early 1950s” (Psychology Today: How Big a Problem is Anxiety Today). This is logical considering that a similar study done in 2010 concluded that high school and college students were more than five times as likely to develop either depression or an anxiety disorder than a student fifty years ago (Psychology Today: The Decline of Play and the Rise of Children's Mental Disorders?). This excessive rise exemplifies the amount of stress students have. As the years pass, it is becoming increasingly evident that anxiety disorder is prevalent among a majority of them. One explanation for this may be that free-time for children to play has dramatically decreased, while the time they spend in school has significantly risen. In addition to that, currently children are now spending “more hours per day, days per year, and years of their life in school than ever before” (Psychology Today: The Decline of Play and the Rise of Children's Mental Disorders). The unreasonable quantity of time a child spends in school limits their freedom to grow as individual and relax. As well, one can infer that the testing system “is almost designed to produce anxiety and depression” (Psychology Today: The Decline of Play and the Rise of Children's Mental Disorders). In addition, some psychologist have noticed a trend of high-achieving students expressing a strong reluctance to attend class because of anxiety, this is becoming common among high school students. Psychologists have referred to this as “school refusal” (Points of View: THE NEW WORRY EPIDEMIC). For students, there is an on-going pressure to get high grades; in that sort of high pressure environment, anxiety is inevitable.
In the past 20 years there has been a technological revolution and although it has made some aspects of life easier,...

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