The Possibility Of Hope In "The Crucible"

1011 words - 4 pages

No matter how bleak they seem, all plays end in hope. Discuss how true this statement is of a non-Shakespearean play you have studied.What is hope? To place one's confidence in the belief that something better will be obtained. "The Crucible" by Arthur Miller is a play in which many innocent characters die. Although the main message of the play is the restoration of hope to the village of Salem in the 17th century, it leaves us with many questions of how much hope we should place in our own society.The outcome of the play did not end in hope for many characters. As accusations permeated through the village, many innocent were falsely accused and condemned. Even the most 'godly' characters were killed such as Rebecca Nurse and Giles Corey. Reverend Hale lost his hope in the law of the Puritan society. At first he arrives in Salem projecting an air of knowledge and faith in the law. "They must be; they are weighted with authority." "Theology sir is a fortress." As he observes the hangings on innocent people he loses his faith in the justice system and this causes him to turn against what he has believed in. "I denounce theses proceedings, I quit this court." The play has a bleak outcome, with the audience losing hope in human nature. It shows us that in difficult situations, good does not always prevail. Proctor's sons would've also lost faith in the justice system and the justice and morality of society as a result of human error and negligence. We can never fully place our hope in the justice of human society because it will eventually fail us.The protagonist and perhaps the most significant character, John Proctor had the bleakest situation with little hope. His affair with Abigail was a cause for her rampage and destruction of the village. Admitting his sins was the only way to prevent further chaos. "I do think I see some shred of goodness in John Proctor. Not enough to weave a banner with, but white enough to keep it from such dogs." This shows he did not have a positive outlook on his death ("not enough to weave a banner with"), as he does not believe he has been fully purified of his sins. Proctor's outlook was bleak and yet his hope lay in death. How can death entail hope? "The hero, instead of being representative of his society, stands out against it and dies because he is not sufficiently separated from values that endure." Ronald Hayman. It shows us that intellect and human will are powerless to prevent injustice when our society, in reality, is not built equality. The reality is that the world is an unfair place. The legally innocent do not always survive. There is a glimmer of hope that the sacrifice of one man would save the inhabitants of Salem from future destruction. However, this is false hope as the reality of human nature is that the same events will occur but in...

Find Another Essay On The possibility of hope in "The Crucible"

On the Possibility of Transcendental Materialism

3367 words - 13 pages On the Possibility of Transcendental Materialism ABSTRACT: The purpose of this address is to argue for the following theses: (1) the concept of transcendentality can be associated not only with idealism but also with materialism; (2) such a connection was made possible by Karl Marx's theory; and (3) in the development of Marxism up to now, theory has been tied to a political movement, which is an error of principle, for what survives of it

The Possibility of Preventing Cardiovascular Disease

1698 words - 7 pages The Possibility of Preventing Cardiovascular Disease ''Cardiovascular disease kills one in 3 people in the uk''[1]. Although cardiovascular diseases are on the decline, it is still Britain's biggest number 1 killer ''responsible for 40% of premature deaths''[2]. The cardio-vascular system is responsible for supplying the body with blood. The heart pumps blood around the body through arteries, veins and capillaries, it

"The Possibility of Evil" by Shirley Jackson

778 words - 3 pages Possibility of EvilEnvy, greed, lust - all examples of "evil" things done by us all; nevertheless, what is evil? Can we stop it, and if so, are we obligated to? Before we speak about the obligation of the normal person to stop evil, we have to understand what evil is. Evil is what a person accepts it as true; this can be seen in the story inside Miss Strangeworth. She does not believe her letters create problems rather than solve them. And that

The Possibility of Evil by Shirley Jackson

1350 words - 6 pages lives of her neigbours. She is portrayed in the story with the author as a proud lady who believes in the fact that she owns her town perhaps a factor that is evidenced by the way she interacts with the members of her community. Her constant conversations with the members of the community perhaps paint her as a relatively calm, loving and caring lady to the members of the community. The theme that has been attached to this story is directly

The Synchronization of Hope

1050 words - 5 pages For me, it’s not hard to get off on the right foot. I can easily adjust to the surroundings wherein I’m dropped off. That is of course if I can find some sufficient funds. Warming up to an area, as I stated previously, may to some, be a quite peculiar and ardent task. My only problem is that I’m quite withdrawn. But, am highly capable of an extremely successful human interaction when I feel there needs to be one. For example: In a quiet elevator

The Synchronization of Hope

944 words - 4 pages , living in Chicago seeing miles of homeless people on the edge of blocks, intersections, local McDonald restaurants, even the occasional bum taking a morning shower in a public restroom (it doesn’t say you can’t.) in my psyche, I wonder two things. One: Is this a future that awaits me? Two: If so, how much do they make in an hour? Sitting in a less than sturdy chair preparing for a regular hair-cut, a poor looking fellow enters the barbershop where I

The Destruction of the Planet and the Possibility of Reform

952 words - 4 pages The Destruction of the Planet and the Possibility of Reform It is widely accepted that humans have been a major cause of environmental problems since we began creating our cities and especially since the Industrial Revolution of the 20th century. All aspects of the Earth have been affected by humans' desire to conquer and dominate the planet. Our impact has gone beyond pollution to altering the functioning of many natural systems. These

The Issues Surrounding the Possibility of Modern Day Artificial Cloning

1673 words - 7 pages . Supporters of cloning also say that if a women okays carrying a clone, she should be able to. However, there are reasons supporting that cloning should not be allowed. First of all, cloning is still not safe. One worry is the possibility that the genetic material used from the adult will could to age so that the genes in a newborn baby clone would be, for example, 50 years old (or more/less) on the day of their birth.  Also, even many of the

The Hope of the Phoenix

1006 words - 4 pages The Hope of the PhoenixThe word phoenix had symbolize immortality, but for the people in Fahrenheit 451, their only hope was that the phoenix would be burn out, and be reborn again. The myth of the phoenix gave optimism to the life of Montag, to the books, and to the world of Fahrenheit 451. The world was now dying, and nobody seemed to care, because the government had brainwashed the people. It was a situation, where not only the brave, but the

Hope in the Totalitarian Realm

1592 words - 6 pages Hope in the Totalitarian Realm The method of the Republic of Gilead to mold subdued and subservient women is first to disenfranchise, then to reeducate. Unlike the women discussed in Swastika Night, women in the United States were not readily compliant in the removal of their economic and reproductive rights. Even Serena Joy, the wife of the commander that Offred has been assigned to, who once toured widely touting the sanctity of the home, now

Hope in the Totalitarian Realm

2001 words - 9 pages Hope in the Totalitarian Realm Religion and the manipulation of history are the most important steps in creating a totalitarian state. In the novels discussed the reader comes to understand true oppression results when hope and power are removed in their totality. Katherine Burdekin’s novel, Swastika Night, portrays women who are degraded and removed, stripped of identity, femininity, and important self-efficacy as societal role-players

Similar Essays

The Possibility Of Evil Essay

558 words - 2 pages conversation between Miss Strangeworth, Mr. Lewis, and Mrs. HarperMiss Strangeworth: "Good morning, Mr. Lewis."Mr.Lewis: "Good morning, Miss Strangeworth. Such a lovely day."Miss Straneworth: "It is a very nice day." (She looks out the window.) "I would like a chop, please, Mr. Lewis, a small, lean veal chop."(She notices Mr. Lewis bringing in a box of strawberries and walks toward them)"Are those strawberries from Arthur Parker's garden? They

Finding Hope In James Muyskens' The Sufficiency Of Hope

6753 words - 27 pages Finding Hope in James Muyskens' The Sufficiency of Hope Most people hope the world is the way they believe it is. That is, most people hope that their view of the world is right. They usually do not hope for the truth about things to be much better than what they suppose it is. Sometimes the hope is a factor in causing the belief; sometimes the hope stems from the desire to be right about one's belief; and in some cases the hope may follow

The Possibility Of The Discarding Of Knowledge

1662 words - 7 pages In this essay, the extent that the discovery/ development of new knowledge in the fields of the natural sciences and history causes the discarding of older and previously held knowledge will be explored. It is important to understand that the definition of knowledge is justified, true, belief. The central knowledge issue that arises from this exploration, is that the discovery/ development of new knowledge cause things that were previously held

The Possibility For Change In Formal Organizations

1295 words - 5 pages employees under each differently. Organizations in which a conventional bureaucracy model has the ability to evolve to a flexible organization model, but there are major changes that need to take place in order to complete the transition.In the early 1900's formal organizations were ran with a specific hierarchy from top to bottom. This was the start of the conventional bureaucracy model, where an organization has a clear chain of command. Orders flow