The Role Of A Good City Thinking: Utopia, Dystopia And Heterotopia

3144 words - 13 pages

Good city thinking
The following essay addresses the discourse around the good city, trying to understand the importance of having a thinking on the topic rather than providing solutions for a good city.
Providing solutions for the good city pose questions such as: good for whom? what is good? etc. These questions prompt that good and city are two words that form more questions than answers. In these nebula of questions urban design plays an important role because its nature is in the urban and therefore in the city. As Madanipour points out, urban design occupies a potentially strategic place in shaping the city of the future (Madanipour, 2006).
Madanipour uses two words that are fundamental in this conversation: city and future. It is therefore important that urban design is concerned not only with the present but also with a long term thinking about cities: the future that is open-ended, even though not infinitely malleable (Friedmann, 2000).
The questions that arise are: What does thinking about the future means? How is possible to imagine something in the future? What is the role of this exercise?

City and Society
When thinking about the good city naturally every person imagines a physical condition to be improved but the physical environment is not the only force that shapes the city. For example, city and urban society cannot be detached (Lefebvre, 1970/2003). Hence the urban society is, combined with the city, an important force in urban development.
“Thus, no discussion of the good life can ignore the particularities of the urban way of life” (Amin, 2007, p.1012).
To aim for a good city therefore a good society has to be formed.

Towards a better view: Utopia and its importance
'Good society for a Good city' can be a slogan for a utopian manifesto alla Fritz Lang in Metropolis (1927) .
In the movie, the role of the slogan is to provide a vision of the future and guide the development of the city.
Therefore, "in order to bring about a world that is fit to live in, we need new and solid ideas for living, persuasive images of the good society” (Friedmann, 2000, p.461)
This persuasive image is defined as utopia and "today more than ever, there is no theory without utopia. Otherwise, a person is content to record what he sees before his eyes” Lefebvre wrote (Pinder, 2013, p.1).
Someone could argue that a utopia is just one vision of the good city but since every citizen has its own image of the good city, it is not possible with one utopia define what is the good city. This statement is correct but misunderstands the role of utopia. “Utopian thinking, at least as far as planners are concerned, is historically grounded in specific emancipatory struggles” (Friedmann, 2000, p.464). Therefore, the role of utopia is very important in helping citizens to achieve a future that will be better than the present situation. Helping to achieve is the key concept for utopia. Utopia does not provide solutions but suggestions for the future....

Find Another Essay On The Role of a Good City Thinking: Utopia, Dystopia and Heterotopia

The role of women in utopia an

3072 words - 12 pages ROLE OF WOMEN ESSAY When reviewing literature, a major question being posed lately is what exactly are women's roles in various books. The works, which I am particularly concerned with in this essay, are William Shakespeare's "Othello" and Thomas More's "Utopia". I will be examining various...

The Creating of a Utopia Essay

988 words - 4 pages Once upon a land, in a time not so far away, there lived a boy named Karl Marx who would grow up to be the Father of Communism. It kind of sounds like a bad passion, but his idea was really well intentioned and sprung from remarks of the daily life around him. After much consideration, Marx helped find a theory called Socialism, a “transitional [period] between capitalism and communism, and distinguished by unequal distribution of goods...

Role of Language and Diversity in the Critical Thinking Process

712 words - 3 pages Language and language diversity play a significant role in critical thinking and its processes. Language is the main device we use as humans to communicate through symbols what we think, experience or feel. Language is also one of the primary methods of transmitting culture. Language diversity is important to critical thinking because of the close relationship between language and culture. Language is used diversely by different cultures,...

Role of Language and Diversity in the Critical Thinking Process

707 words - 3 pages My girlfriend and I have been fortunate enough to vacation several times in Hawaii. The island of Maui is our favorite. The island of Maui holds a special place in my heart, because of the one-on-one time I was able to spend with my girlfriend. We enjoy the breathtaking scenery and the tranquil sunsets. The highlight of our trips has been the helicopter rides. The helicopter is the only way to see some of the islands awesome waterfalls and...

The role of Organizing in Critical Thinking

525 words - 2 pages The Role of Organizing in Critical ThinkingThe role of organizing in critical thinking is necessary in processing information that we receive on a daily basis. Without organization, there would be confusion within the everyday

The Utopia of Orwell and Foucault

1372 words - 5 pages The Utopia of Orwell and Foucault “Two ways of exercising power over men, of controlling their relations, of separating out their dangerous mixtures. The plague stricken town, transversed throughout with hierarchy, surveillance, observation, writing; the town immobilized by the functioning of an extensive power that bears in a distinct way over all individual bodies-this is the utopia of the perfectly governed city” (Foucault, 6) This quote...

The United States: A Modern Dystopia

3033 words - 12 pages Content I. Introduction: 1. The two dystopias 2. Why the United States is a mix of both II. Body: 1. Announcing the War 2. Synthesizing Unity 3. Silencing Opposition 4. Dehumanizing the Enemy III. Conclusion: 1. The Hypocrisy of Modern Society In English literature, two versions of dystopia exist. The first is the one George Orwell presented in his famous novel 1984.1 It is a dystopia in which the government engages in...

Evaluate the role of positive thinking, relaxation, meditation and prayer in the healing of physical ailments.

1559 words - 6 pages 1 Evaluate the role of positive thinking, relaxation, meditation and prayer in the healing of physical ailments. Introduction People of various cultures have relied on what Western medical practitioners today call Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM). This term covers a broad range of healing...

Role of the City in Poe’s Murders in the Rue Morgue and Hoffmann’s Mademoiselle de Scudery

4265 words - 17 pages Role of the City in Poe’s Murders in the Rue Morgue and Hoffmann’s Mademoiselle de Scudery Professor’s comment: This student perceptively examines the role of the city as a setting and frame for detective fiction. Focusing on two early examples, Poe’s “Murders in the Rue Morgue” and Hoffmann’s “Mademoiselle de Scudery,” both set in Paris, his sophisticated essay illuminates the “cityness” or framed constraint that renders the city a backdrop...

The Horror of Dystopia Revealed by Neuromancer

1603 words - 6 pages The Horror of Dystopia Revealed by Neuromancer When William Gibson's futuristic novel Neuromancer  was first published, it seemed farfetched that technology could reach the level of sophistication he described. Science fiction movies have since repeated and expanded upon this theme, portraying corporate anxieties and paranoid fears of people to be controlled by aliens, man-made machines and artificial intelligence. Neuromancer takes us...

A Compare and Contrast of Thomas Moores Utopia and Machiavelli?s The Prince

1468 words - 6 pages Just vs. Viable      To be just is to be fair and honorable. Kids are taught that if you are kind and just you will excel and be successful. But life’s not fair and being just doesn’t necessary mean that a society will stand the test of time and be able to grow. The two different societies introduced in More’s Utopia and Machiavelli’s The Prince are very different and although More’s Utopian society would be considered...

Similar Essays

Utopia And Dystopia In Harrison Bergeron And The Lottery

1479 words - 6 pages Utopia and Dystopia are themes that explore the substantial extents of deceiving ascendancy and contrive an impelling illusion of a ‘perfect‘ society. Utopia is described as a place, state, or condition that is ideally perfect in respect of politics, laws, customs, and conditions while a dystopia, or a negative utopia, is a society characterized as an illusion of a perfect society maintained through oppressive societal control, in which exploits...

The History Of The Term Utopia And Dystopia With Reference To An Advertisement And A Painting To Show The Meaning Of These Two Terms.

980 words - 4 pages The word utopia is a term for an ideal society. It has been used by both communities trying to make an ideal society and in fictional societies. It often used to describe an unrealistic ideal that can never be achieved which has often led to other concepts, namely, dystopia. Utopias are generally said to be societies in which the political, social and economic troubles hampering its inhabitants has been done away with. Instead the state is...

Value Of A Dystopia Essay

2527 words - 10 pages A perfect world with no negative aspects can be defined as a utopia. A utopia consists of having all the required or desirable elements of life that one has in mind. Everyone has an altered perception on what a utopia is, but in order for the world to be a utopia a universal definition is vital. Some elements to be considered in a utopia include a society that is stable socially, morally, politically, and economically. The more a world is in...

The Myopia Of Dystopia Essay

5279 words - 21 pages The Myopia of Dystopia Throughout human history, matters not which civilization; humanity has endeavored to attain a sociality in which one can live with freedom, enjoyment, justice, and happiness. It is human nature to see oneself in a place where it is flourishing and enjoyable, and unfortunately that is often elsewhere then where one is; after all isn't "the grass always greener on the other side" (Eng. Proverb). Countless writers have...