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The Role Of Chance In Thomas Hardy's "Tess Of The D'urbervilles"

572 words - 2 pages

Written as an exhortation on the sexual hypocrisy of English society in the 1800s, Thomas Hardy's "Tess of the d'Urbervilles" chronicles the events that lead eventually to the death of the virginal Tess. Random chance initiates more of the conflicts in "Tess of the d'Urbervilles" than any of the more subtle and realistic happenings. Coincidence also plays a serious role in complicating the events in the plot. The resolutions in Hardy's plot more often than not result from chance occurrences. By discussing the affect chance has on initiating, complicating, and resolving issues in the plot of Thomas Hardy's "Tess of the d'Urbervilles," one can come to better understand the plot.Hardy's Tess has more dreadful things befall her by pure happenstance than most other literary figures of her time. One may say that the parson's revelation of the Durbeyfield's true lineage reveals the instance that causes the rest of the plot to appear feasible. However precipitous that even may have seemed, the accidental skewering of the Durbeyfield's only horse leads to more mishap then any other single event in the text. Tess's rape by Alec Stokes, in the last pages of Phase the First, paves the way for endless reoccurrences of ill happenings throughout the rest of the text. These occurrences may lead the reader to believe, not incorrectly, that much of the rest of the novel contains a great deal of awful events.Not only does coincidence play a large part in initiating conflict, it also seems to go out of its way to complicate it. Take for example the impregnation of Tess by Alec; this event throws Tess's life far off of its original course. Later the loss...

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