The Role Of Nature In The Poetry Of William Wordsworth

1358 words - 5 pages

In William Wordsworth’s poems, the role of nature plays a more reassuring and pivotal r ole within them. To Wordsworth’s poetry, interacting with nature represents the forces of the natural world. Throughout the three poems, Resolution and Independence, Tintern Abbey, and Michael, which will be discussed in this essay, nature is seen prominently as an everlasting- individual figure, which gives his audience as well as Wordsworth, himself, a sense of console. In all three poems, Wordsworth views nature and human beings as complementary elements of a sum of a whole, recognizing that humans are a sum of nature. Therefore, looking at the world as a soothing being of which he is a part of, Wordsworth looks at nature and sees the benevolence of the divinity aspects behind them. For Wordsworth, the world itself, in all its glory, can be a place of suffering, which surely occurs within the world; Wordsworth is still comforted with the belief that all things happen by the hands of the divinity and the just and divine order of nature, itself.
In William Wordsworth’s poem, Resolution and Independence, Wordsworth describes the moods of the poem through the description of nature. The first appearance of the speaker, himself, is shown in (line 15); where he classifies himself as a traveler who has been seduced, as he states, “The pleasant season did my heart employ” (line 19). We see the traveler as a bright and joyful person as Wordsworth’s characteristics of nature as a means of description continues throughout the poem. As the poem progresses, the speaker’s attitude changes in (line 26), where he tells us that his mood is lowered. It is here that the speaker presents himself as “a happy child of earth” in (line 31); as once again Wordsworth ties the world of humans into the world of nature. Later, in (line 55) the speaker comes across “the oldest man” leaning over a pond. Once again, Wordsworth demonstrates from nature to give us a description of the old man, as he states, “Motionless as a cloud the old Man stood,” (line 75). He then goes through a series of thoughts and emotions in which he describes his fears in life. He has expressed a fear that because he is a poet, his life will end in “despondency and madness,” (line 49). The inner conflict that the speaker faces is the man he is by nature and the poet he is by vocation. The inner conflict he wrestles with is: Should I follow who I am by nature and follow my passion, become a poet? He mentions Chatterton, “the marvelous Boy” (line 43), who killed himself because of his failures as a poet. The narrator fears a similar fate. Through his meeting with the Leech-gatherer, he is able to see that one can persevere through life and remain sharp.
In the poem Tintern Abbey, Wordsworth carefully analyzes the stages of his spiritual development within nature. During the first of these three stages he has no conscious acquaintance to Nature. The first stage, the past, of his acquaintance with Nature it was not...

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