The Role Of The Pigs In The Novel "Animal Farm" By George Orwell.

772 words - 3 pages

The pigs are perhaps the most interesting characters in the novel, "Animal Farm", written by George Orwell. They bring conflict and perceive as the most important animals in their Animal Revolution and most important people involved in Russian history. Throughout this fairytale, they become what they had hoped to destroy.The role of the pigs in this story is that they are true leaders. They represent the Bolsheviks of Russia. They are the highest in the animal society structure and highest in the level of intelligence. The pigs led all animalism activities such as planning how to do away with Mr. Jones, and strategic ways to fight in wars and defeat any invaders. They make all choices about animal life, despite calling for majority votes. Due to lack of intelligence and mentally persuaded minds, the other animals did abide by the rules of all the pigs. Pigs were the ones who built this revolution, and turned out to be the ones who would destroy everything they fought against. However, all the pigs weren't exactly the "bad guys," as what they appear to be.The most important pigs in this novel are Old Major, Napoleon, Snowball, and Squealer. Old Major is a very important character in which that the revolution took place because of his desires, and his virtue making other animals feel comfortable under his rule. He taught and preached Animalism and the greatness of freedom to the common animals. He showed this when he recalled this song from a dream, Beasts of England. It gave the common animals a feeling that they were being treated poorly and they deserved better than what they got. It was truly important because what he told the common animals came from his heart and was the truth. A true follower of Major became of Snowball. Snowball was a young and smart motivational speaker. He was a character that really wanted to make life better for the animals in an exact way that Old Major wanted. Snowball was the better pig that was in a power struggle with Napoleon to run the Animal Revolution.Napoleon and Squealer is a totally different pair. Napoleon is power crazy and is very egotistic. He is cruel, brutal, selfish, and devious. He kills for his own benefit. He plays a great...

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