The Role Of Women In "Things Fall Apart", By Chinua Achebe.

703 words - 3 pages

Woman of Umuofia.In the novel, "Things Fall Apart" by Chinua Achebe, the arrival of the white man, changes the society of the Ibo people. The Ibo culture is very simple, and may seem silly, but is justified by them. They have a social class order and women are never part of it. The women in Ibo society are dominated by the men. The main character Okonkwo, struggles throughout the novel with himself and the fear of being portrayed as womanly, for this is a sign of weakness in the Ibo civilization.The people of Umuofia have a functioning society. They use their religion as their primary focus on life. Religion is their explanation to the unknown. They believe strongly in their "chi" or personal god. The Ibo people were faithful to their gods and perpetual on their traditions. The men in this tribe are the head of the household, very strong, and were to be warrior-like.Throughout the novel, women have no significant status. During special meetings within their community, women are to be seen and not heard. "It was clear from the way the crowd stood or sat that the ceremony was for men. There were many women, but they looked on from the fringe like outsiders."(87) They have no say in any major decisions; they do what they are told, as if they are slaves. Since women were characterized as weak and men as strong, being thought of as womanly was a disgrace. "Agala was not only another name for a woman, it could also mean a man who had taken no title."(13)Wife beating is very common in Umuofia. There was an incident in which Okonkwo beat one of his wives, Ojiugo, when she did not come home to make his meal. "He beat her very heavily."(29) He was only punished because he beat her during the Week of Peace. "It was unheard of to beat somebody during the sacred weak."(30) Since men are to be the warriors and strict they had to be stern. "No matter how prosperous a man was, if he was unable to rule his women and his children he was not...

Find Another Essay On The Role of Women in "Things Fall Apart", by Chinua Achebe.

"Things Fall Apart" by Chinua Achebe.

1462 words - 6 pages The novel, Things Fall Apart, by Chinua Achebe, describes a traditional village in Africa called Ibo. Achebe is trying to tell the outside world about the little village and to remind the people of its own traditional values. In those days, many Africans were just willing to accept that there culture as nothing and full of rubble, as the European influence grew. In this novel Achebe will enlighten the reader with fascinating descriptions and

"Things Fall Apart" by Chinua Achebe.

567 words - 2 pages In the novel 'Things Fall Apart' by Chinua Achebe, a society is presented to us, a society that has its faults and mistakes. Achebe creates a world of people who like us are human and make common mistakes. He explains the complexity of these people and how the colonization had affected their clan. His objective is not farther towards one side as to the other, yet in some occasions it may feel so.There is a constant balance between reason and

"Things fall apart" by Chinua Achebe.

562 words - 2 pages An African man, Chinua Achebe, wrote the novel, "Things Fall Apart", at the age of 26. The story portrays his theme of life, 'when one thing stands another stands beside it'. The main character, Okonkwo, lead a somewhat complicated life. As it began, it was ruled by courage and strength, but he chose to end it with a weak escape from every challenge he had ever been given, suicide.As his life began he was given nothing. His father, Unoka, was a

Things Fall Apart By Chinua Achebe

1412 words - 6 pages In this world, there are many types of religions and cultures, each having its own views on life and how one should live. Not everyone decides to accept a specific religion, but they are handed their culture and way of living. The environment that one is raised in becomes one's culture. In the book Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe, the Ibo culture reveals a lot about itself. It showed the uniqueness of this particular culture. The uniqueness

The Effect of Colonialism in Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

715 words - 3 pages This essay is about the effect of Colonialism seen in the book Things Fall Apart. Through out the whole book you can see different impressions on the tribe, many other people, and the relationships between the white man and the black man.      "Does the white man understand our custom about land?" "How can he when he does not even speak our tongue? But he says that our customs are bad; and our own brothers who have taken up his

Gender Roles in Things Fall Apart, by Chinua Achebe

2367 words - 9 pages , acceptance, and peace which many of the Igbo people were seeking. They did not find it in Igbo religion, so they looked elsewhere. If Okonkwo and Umofia had properly balanced the traits of fatherhood and motherhood, then their children would not have forsaken them and their lives would not have fallen apart. Primary Source Achebe, Chinua. Things Fall Apart. New York: Random House, 1994. Secondary Sources Iyasẹre, Solomon Ogbede

Cultural Change Explored in Things Fall Apart, by Chinua Achebe

1882 words - 8 pages becomes clear that these people are a ‘disease’ poisoning the society of African tribes according to Okonkwo and many others. Change can be truly classified as a positive or negative aspect in the lives of countless African men, women and children, but is the change in African tribes for the better or for worse? Works Cited Achebe, Chinua. Things Fall Apart. London: Heinemann New Windmills, 1958. Print Kortenaar, Neil Ten. “Becoming

Theme of Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

731 words - 3 pages Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe is a novel set in Nigeria at the time that it was first being colonized by Europeans. The novel is centered on the character Okonkwo, who was at the beginning of the novel a great and respected man in his village, Umuofia. Okonkwo was a rich man with three wives and several children who held an important leader position in the village. The main focus of the book is on the changes that take place not only in

Misogyny in Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad and Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

1458 words - 6 pages Misogyny, the hatred or dislike of females, is a recurrent theme in World Literature. Women’s suffrage was at its prime between 1840 and 1920. Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad and Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe, two stories based in Africa, show different points of misogyny, the first being from the time of women’s suffrage, and the latter being after the women’s suffrage movement. The value, view, and role of women was undermined greatly

Essay on the Role of Women in Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart

1852 words - 7 pages where women are even treated as humans instead of animals or slaves. All in all the women of Things Fall Apart are treated with such enormous disrespect and disgust and the reader cannot help but be sickened and saddened by not only the reality of women in Africa but of Achebe's portrayal of it.   Works Cited Achebe, Chinua. Things Fall Apart. London: William Heinemann Ltd., 1958. Chun, June. "The Role of Women in Things Fall

"Colonialism and Ibo society" in reference to the book "Things Fall Apart" by Chinua Achebe.

823 words - 3 pages the changes brought upon his village because his whole life was focused on the traditional aspects of Ibo structure and unity. Colonialists forced their government and rules onto Ibo villages once they had made some groundwork in converting villagers. Missionaries first arrived preaching their peaceful religion, soon to cause a division in Ibo society. So in the end, the advancement of colonialism caused the weakening and unraveling of traditional Ibo society through the introduction of Western principles.Works CitedAchebe, Chinua. Things Fall Apart. New York NY: Doubleday, 1959.

Similar Essays

The Role Of Women In Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart

3673 words - 15 pages the weak and the women are the welcoming arms of Christianity -- an alien religion which steals quietly into the clan, gathering adherents from those oppressed by Umuofia's rigid insistence on allegiance to gods, customs, and laws. The Absence of a Moderating Female Principle Things Fall Apart is redolent of violent conflicts occasioned by the utter lack of a moderating female influence. One example of this absence can be found in Achebe s

Things Fall Apart By Chinua Achebe

1126 words - 5 pages mistreatment shows a large amount of emotional strength. This reflection of Ibo women that one gleans from Things Fall Apart can also be seen in real Ibo culture, as women are treated and act in very parallel ways. (Kramer) It is clear that Achebe is not being sexist when he talks about women in his novel; instead he is relaying facts about the real life tribe. In conclusion, Chinua Achebe’s novel Things Fall Apart is not being sexist. He uses this

Things Fall Apart By Chinua Achebe

1767 words - 7 pages In Chinua Achebe’s Classic 1959 novel Things Fall Apart, we are faced with the foreign ways of the Ibo people of present-day Nigeria. The story is told through the experiences and often times thoughts of protagonist Okonkwo, an imperfect but respected clansman whose fear of appearing weak drives every decision he makes. In the peak of conflict, Okonkwo is exiled for seven years, loses much of the esteem he had gained and finds his bad Chi to be

Things Fall Apart By Chinua Achebe

1105 words - 4 pages Umuofia is a village in Africa, and the inhabitants there are usually united. However, when the Christians arrive and permeate the village, the clan changes but also falls apart. The novel in which this story takes place is called Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe. The story is about a well-respected man named Okonkwo who has three wives and many children, the oldest being Nwoye. Okonkwo is banished for seven years from Umuofia, and during