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The Role Played By John Pym Ensured That Parliament Was Always Likely To Win The First Civil War Of 1642

896 words - 4 pages

'The role played by John Pym ensured that Parliament was always likely to win the first Civil War of 1642-1646' How far do you agree with this judgement? (30 marks)Although John Pym died in 1643, his actions regarding the Civil War of 1642-1646 helped to ensure Parliament's victory. However it is unfair to say that he is solely to thank for this victory as Parliament's tactical placing meant that they had greater resources etc. This combined with Pym's actions did mean that victory was always likely for Parliament.It seems that the role of Pym was hugely influential in securing Parliament's victory though as he helped to organise Parliament's finances, this is shown with the excise tax in July 1643 which was a tax on beer, lager and all relevant commodities meaning that it affected everyone and was therefore very useful in raising money for Parliament, this partnered with the Assessment Ordinance of February 1643 which was proportional to wealth also meant that the taxation was not too unpopular as it seemed fair.Furthermore, the Impressments Ordinance of 1643 introduced conscription meaning that Parliament had a lot of troops who were paid and were therefore loyal and better trained. Even more troops were given to Parliament as a result of the Scottish alliance; the Solemn League and Covenant organised by Pym; the Scots sent 20,000 troops and June 1644 the Royalists had lost York, and therefore their influence in the North, this was thanks to Pym's organisation of the alliance with Scotland, a factor that shows that Pym had made it more likely for the Parliamentarians to win the civil war.The quality and unity of the troops organised by Pym was also higher than the Royalists as the Royalists troops were worried about Catholicism as Charles signed the Cessation Treaty with the Irish Catholics in 1643, where he promised govern Ireland with a Catholic Lord Lieutenant, to introduce Catholic Bishops into the Irish House of Lords and make Catholicism the official religion of Ireland. This reignited the fear of Catholicism meaning that the troops weren't committed in their fighting as unlike the Parliamentarians, they didn't believe in what they were fighting for. This is because the Parliamentarian troops believed they were fighting justly, for God and what he would want.Pym further helped Parliament to win the first Civil War as he neither sided with the 'war' or 'peace' groups, meaning that he stayed neutral in the middle and was able to manipulate both sides and bridge the two extremes meaning there was less division within Parliament's side.However, as mentioned it is not fair to give John Pym all the credit of Parliaments victory of the first Civil War. Parliament's superior...

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