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The Role Played By Stereotyping In The Social Control Of Women

2273 words - 9 pages

The Role Played by Stereotyping in the Social Control of Women

It can be argued that women can be controlled in many aspects of
society by stereotyping them and opinions based upon that have been
instilled for centuries amongst society.

There are many areas of society that this is apparent. Women have a
variety of roles within the super structure of society and can often
be seen to be “inferior” to men in many different aspects of life.

It has been a value that has been instilled and embedded within
society throughout life that men are seen as superior to women. Men
have always been the ones seen to be the “bread winner” and the
provider for the family. It is a value that has been enforced
throughout history and has seen men dominate all aspects of work, the
criminal system and positions of status in society.

Up until at recent as the 1920’s women couldn’t even vote in countries
like America. This is a clear indication of male superiority in
society. Women had previously no input into the political element of
society and liberal rights to vote. This clearly shows that the
opinions towards women having an influence on how society was shaped
and organised was extremely poor. Attitudes to women have always been
for them to provide a family and also for them to deal with domestic
issues such as cooking, washing and ironing for her husband whilst he
would work. These attitudes have stuck for a long time and are still
clear in present day society to a certain extent.

Even in a modern day society it is clear that women are still seen to
be more domesticated then men. In areas such as education, subjects
like childcare, and home economics are dominated by women and it is
frowned upon for male involvement in these subjects. This
stereotypical view that a woman should be more domesticated than a man
is slowly decreasing. And it is becoming more “acceptable” in society
for a man to do the housework and share the load. This view however of
women can help dictate which way a women’s career will go. It leads
them into specific jobs and creates areas of work which are dominated
by a particular sex. For example women dominate occupations such as
nurses, mid-wives, and secretaries. Whereas more manual labour jobs
such as plumbing, electricians, builders and more manually stressful
jobs are dominated by men.

This is all due to the knock on effect of how women are perceived in
society. The stereotypical view that is held by men against women
creates a glass ceiling for women in all areas of society which makes
it difficult for them to achieve the top positions of employment in
all aspects of work.

Throughout the world there is male domination. This goes from every
angle of society. Every world leader is a male and this is commonly
due to the fact that men gain more respect than...

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