This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

The Roles Of Languages In Culture

1048 words - 4 pages

Role Of Language In Identity Formation Cultural Studies EssayPeople that have multilingual background face complex issues in adapting and assimilating their language to cultural identity that they want to be identified with. People create their linguistic structure so as to bear a resemblance to those of the group with which from time to time they wish to identify. Cultural identity is defined as the product of social and historical background that is constructed when an individual categorize themselves a group, in addition to social context and ethnically accustomed communicative structures in a particular society (Jung and Lee,2004). Language serves as a tool that embraces one's identity and operates as a mean of uniting a cultural community that share the same collective identity.In the process of identity formation, language functions as a tool that holds the cultural identity that the language resembles. Professor Ngugi Wa Thiong'o, an African scholar and Kenyan author claims that "language is a carrier of culture" (cited in Ka'ili and Ka'ili). He explains that the distinctiveness qualities that a culture possessed for example, its own value, custom, principles, faith, ideologies and the ways of life are embed in its own language. Ka'ili and Ka'ili (1998) gives an example about the relationship between language and identity that is embedded in a culture of faka'apa'apa to the variety of status in Tongan social hierarchy; this cultural customs is conceded in the Tongan language of respect. A Tongan speaker will utilize variety form of Tongan speech to express the level of faka'apa'apa that is ethnically suitable for the person ones is speaking to. This illustration demonstrate the role that language play in the process of identity formation.Lanehart (1996) in her article alleges that "language is a part of one's culture and identity". In the article, Laneheart explains the connection between language and identity and how they are related with each other. She claims that "our identities emerge from our transaction" which is develop within a culture, whither language is essential. Lanehart relates language and identity through the concept of "language goals" where people construct their language structure so as to bear similitude with the cluster they want to identify with and want to become. As an African American, she gives her view based on her social experience where she explains the dilemma that African Americans face when they try to incorporate their language to cultural identity that they want to identified with. Social perception that equates the choice to speak Standard English as trying to be White creates a dilemma in most people that have multilingual background. This perception and situation demonstrate that there is a significant connection between language and identity formation.However, the role as a cultural identity that the language play is debatable because there are some cases when the individuals does not identify...

Find Another Essay On the roles of languages in culture

The Importance of Learning Languages Essay

724 words - 3 pages the world is based in the most populated country on the earth that is China, beating the second most spoken language, English, by two is to one ratio, and Mandarin Chinese is the most popular language in the world. There are about 1,213,000,000 people who speak mandarin today. While there is only 508 million people speaking English. When both culture meet and mix, there would be a chance of new language developed. Language is undeniably very

Islamic Women and the Gender Roles in Muslim Culture

1883 words - 8 pages , the news etc.; from the veil, Islamic women's oppression, education of Islam women, and the overall representation of the Muslim women—we see negativity. Through education of Islamic traditions, history and culture, we as a society can have a better understanding of what Islam really represents. Here in the United States the Muslim “gender roles” in some other countries may seem unfair and barbaric because they are different but with proper

Gender Roles in Dakota Culture

975 words - 4 pages "packages," different cultures have chosen to associate very different behaviors, interactions, and statuses with men and women. Gender categories are arbitrary constructions of culture, and consequently, gender-appropriate behaviors vary widely from culture to culture.” (23). Gender roles are completely defined by the culture each person lives in. While some may think that another culture is sexist, or demeaning in their ways, it does not mean

Programming languages used in the workplace

568 words - 2 pages Throughout my years of experience in the Information Technology field, I have dealt with numerous software developers whose jobs ranged from Web application development, to device driver software found in computers; and everything in between. To talk about programming languages used, I could not limit this to my current job. In order to provide a thorough analysis of the programming languages used, I am also using information obtained at my

Elementary Education: Foreign Languages in the Classroom

640 words - 3 pages many different schools, only a small percentage of backgrounds is represented in the school population or in the community in which families live. Therefore, exposure to different cultures is already very small. An increase of exposure to culture by exposure of foreign languages will open the minds of children in several ways including how other people live, a culture’s religious practices and celebrations, and where the children’s ancestors

The Importance of Learning New Languages

894 words - 4 pages languages. One may think it is a waste of time, and others may think it would benefit that individual. It is important to learn some other languages because it develops the mind, increases job opportunities, and help understand people with other languages. Learning a new language always plays an important role in developing the mind. As we all know, it is important to have some activities that activates the brain and keep it in good shape. One

The Mayan Languages of Guatemala and Mexico

1219 words - 5 pages FIU Data Analysis Essay The Mayan languages of Guatemala and Mexico can be called a “linguistic area” (Study Guide, 2014, p. 102) because they are geographically in close proximity and the “languages” of the speech communities there would “have been spoken side by side for many generations” (ibid). Due to long-term contact between speech communities in this linguistic area, bilingualism and language mixing in the speeches of the close-knit

The Impacts Of Images: Photographic Languages

2326 words - 10 pages photographic language, the photographer and the audience should have some cultural beliefs and artistic sensibilities in common. This paper argues that photograph as a medium of communication provides the viewer an emotional impact, which is produced by various photographic techniques.It takes an understanding of semiotics--the study of signs--to discover how every image is a complex collection of symbols with distinctive meaning depending on the culture

Technology and Language in Education: The Effect of New Technology on Teaching Languages

1604 words - 6 pages Technology and Language in Education: The Effect of New Technology on Teaching Languages Annie Moore, a 15-year-old girl from Ireland arrived at Ellis Island in New York City on January 1, 1892. She was the first immigrant to come to that United States immigration station, but she was certainly not the last. According to the U.S. Census Bureau (2000), 28.4 million of the 285.2 million US residents in 2000 were foreign-born. With such a

The Roles of Women in Different Societies

1298 words - 5 pages Women have been suffering discrimination in societies for years. They are considered inferior to men. In two different societies women’s have different roles, in Buddhist societies women are thought o have evolved socially than in Brahmanic societies . Women lead very different lives in Brahmanic and Buddhist societies. Buddhism was created by Buddha(565–485 BCE). The Buddha wanted equality. Instead of trying to overcome the strict caste system

Changes in the Roles of Women

967 words - 4 pages The roles of women changed drastically between 1950’s and 1970’s due to the political, economic, and social issues, but women’s lives also stayed close to the way they had always been. The lives of women changed in a plethora of ways throughout the years. “We believe that women can achieve such equality only by accepting to full the challenges and responsibilities they share with all other people in our society, as part of the decision-making

Similar Essays

Roles Of Women In Vedic Culture

3513 words - 14 pages Roles of Women in Vedic Culture Vedic culture seems to have conflicting views regarding its attitude towards women, specifically its attitude towards a woman’s sexuality. This conflict can be seen by contrasting the ways in which women are treated in sacrificing rituals with how they are treated in a more intimate atmosphere, such as lovemaking, which is still often treated as a ritual in and of itself; ritual regarding fertility, love, and

The Culture Of India: Types Of Rituals, Dances, Jewelry, Languages, People, And Customs

2378 words - 10 pages India’s culture is very diverse. One may call it strange, weird, or even bizarre. The culture of India includes: different types of rituals, dances, jewelry, languages, people, and different customs. India’s culture is very beautiful and distinguishable. From rituals to languages the culture of India is amazing and full of life. The rituals in India are very unique. They are rituals for religion, Jain, and Sikh. There are many more

The Roles Of Culture, Mothers, And Daughters In Amy Tan's The Joy Luck Club

1340 words - 5 pages more Americanized" (Ballantine Teacher’s Guide on The Joy Luck Club). The daughters were raised in America, which meant that they were influenced a great deal by American ways. There was no preventing that. The significance of the relationships between mother and daughter were a result of a clash of culture between Chinese belief and American tradition. WORKS CITED   Tan, Amy. The Joy Luck Club. New York: Random House, 1989.

Minority Languages Of The Pyrenees Essay

2569 words - 11 pages France, are minority languages. Both are distinct from Castilian Spanish with their own literature, people, and culture. While Basque and Catalan are prevalent in their respective Spanish autonomous communities, the “border” of the Països Catalans (Catalan Countries) and Euskal Herria (Basque Country) extends into the south of France. I will discuss the status of Basque and Catalan in their respective cultural regions, the social, political and