The Roles Of Power And Truth

1438 words - 6 pages

Power and truth play different but equal roles in maintaining control in a nation. Modern societies create regimes of truth that are enforced by power structures such as government, discipline and laws. When it comes to power, the government, queen or dictator is in charge. They tell their citizens what the main expectations are and how to abide by them. Nevertheless, the government should uphold fairness and not abuse its power unless it is necessary. Power is something that is earned; it is not something that is granted by default. The proper qualities, such as integrity, assertiveness and truth, in government or person can benefit its leadership skill set. Sometimes truth can be manipulated by the government to influence its people so that they will always have faith in their government. This should only happen if the nation is in great peril. As an individual, however, one should be able to see right through certain situations and facts. Although these two factors, power and truth, can alter a person, it cannot change a person completely if he or she is willing to be knowledgeable about their government and environment.
A government creates laws based on morals to manage different types of behaviors and problems within the society. By setting laws, rules and restrictions, a government has the power to limit its citizens. In the United States, laws are formed from four sources: constitutional law, statutory law, administrative law and the common law. These are passed through Congress, the House of Representatives, and the Senate where it will be examined and voted upon. Once the law is accepted among the committees, it is given to the president to vote or veto it. Then if the president vetoes the bill, it can still become a law if two-thirds of the Senate and two-thirds of the House then vote in favor of the bill. This procedure shows that the United States considers laws and doesn't permit the president, one person, to have all the power. An example of a law that was recently passed in 2009 was the use of handheld personal communications devices in certain motor vehicles. Safety is the main reason this law was put into place. In the novel 1984, the Party abuses its power to take advantage of the people in Oceania. The Party is constantly monitoring its citizens, allowing no privacy and no right to individual freedom. Their precautions used throughout Oceania are the Thought Police and the Junior Spies. The Thought Police roam the streets day and night, making sure that everyone is obeying Big Brother and the Party. Junior Spies are the children of Oceania used to spy on the adults and inform the Party whether there is disloyalty. It is evident that these types of restrictions on the citizens can cause a revolt. Winston joins with Julia and together they pursuit their escapade against the Party. Likewise, in the United States, protesters are largely known throughout the nation. The individuals that have a problem become very knowledgeable...

Find Another Essay On The Roles of Power and Truth

Describe the roles of parents and carers

1463 words - 6 pages they function in society.· Traditionally, a father's role was in the public realm of work, while female roles were based around their husband's household (known as the domestic sphere. Men are often viewed as assertive, aggressive and domineering, while the women were viewed as house-makers and child-bearers. Now tasks are shared equally around the home, such as discipline. Discipline is shared between both parents, whereas, men used

The Changing Roles and Status of Women

1060 words - 4 pages The Changing Roles and Status of Women In 1903 the suffragette movement was born with the formation of the Women's Social and Political Union (WPSU) by Emmeline Pankhurst and her two daughters Christabel and Sylvia. At first the newly formed suffragettes relied on spreading propaganda to gain support. However, on the 18th October 1905 they gained considerable unplanned publicity when Christabel Pankhurst and

The Roles And Responsibilities of A Nurse

1601 words - 6 pages The nursing profession has changed drastically over time. The roles and responsibilities that nurses take on have increased and become far more complicated. Nurses are managers, leaders, supervisors and have become experts in many areas of care. Every day nurses are faced with the task of improving and strengthening professional leadership within their work environment. Managing good quality and eliminating risk is the major challenge

The Truth Project: The Search of Truth

1610 words - 7 pages ? Isaiah 6 gives us the solution: we must gaze into the face of God. This journey of seeking His face exposes us, exposes our culture, and turns us into world changers. This quest is only for those brave enough to explore the wondrous depths and layers of the Most High. It is the search for truth-- the most life-changing discovery an individual will ever uncover. Tour One: Veritology Doctor Del Tackett challenges your way of thinking with a question

Flexibility of the Truth

1893 words - 8 pages "Story-truth is sometimes truer than happening-truth." (171) When most people read this quote in Tim O’Brien’s The Things They Carried, they think story truth is emotional truth while happening truth refers to the facts and reality. But beneath the surface we see that the truth is never actually told. No matter how you tell a story the actual truth will never be revealed. The actual truth is for our own sense of self. Throughout the story

Merlin and the facts of the truth and fiction.

989 words - 4 pages To discern the fact of the matter about King's Arthur's court, facts must be drawn from the fiction of "The Court". With all of the knowledge we are learning about King Arthur, it must be discerned who some of these characters really are. With this being what one must do; one must see what history we have of the time. There is one history that must be consulted to find out what the truth of Great Britain's "great" King must be. The most

Roles of the Synagogue

2027 words - 8 pages Roles of the Synagogue The synagogue is a place for the Jewish people to worship God, or more particularly, where Jewish people can hear the Torah being read and pray to God. As well as functioning as a House of Prayer, or 'Beit ha Tefilah', the synagogue is also known as House of Assembly, 'Beit ha Knesset' and House of Study, 'Beit ha Midrash'. 'On three things the world stands', says the Mishnah, 'On the study of

Issues of power and control are evident from the start of the play. To what extent do you find the truth of this statement reflected in Acts I & II of 'The Tempest'?

1076 words - 4 pages throughout this play, however somehow still keeps the interest of the audience while conveying all information, whether necessary or not. In this way Shakespeare displays his power and control over his use of the English language as well as introducing the audience to this uncharted territory of his imagination. From the very start of the play Shakespeare presents the audience with the magical power of Prospero. Act I scene i of ‘The Tempest

The Roles and Impacts of Computers and Communications Technology

1370 words - 5 pages The Roles and Impacts of Computers and Communications Technology I am specifically going to speak about foreign workers handling UK consumer calls and IT jobs in general, better known as offshoring or out-sourcing. Below I have tried to out-line some of the good and bad points about the subject Benefits The advocates of offshoring describe it as having high potential; moving jobs to a low cost labour market

The roles of pride and prejudice in Pride and Prejudice

1413 words - 6 pages Becoming an immediate success in the contemporary novel public in early nineteenth century, Pride and Prejudice has proved to be the most popular of Jane Austen's novels and remains a classic masterpiece two centuries later. The title itself describes the underlying theme of the book. Pride and prejudice, intimately related in the novel, serve as challenges to the cherished love story of Darcy and Elizabeth. It is interesting to see how these

The Conflict between Truth and Ideals in "Heart of Darkness"

1200 words - 5 pages The Conflict between Truth and Ideals in "Heart of Darkness"The story "Heart of Darkness", by Joseph Conrad, is concerned as much with the journey into the "darkness" of man's soul as it is with the literal journey into unknown lands. The protagonist, Marlow, describes the moral dilemmas that outweigh the physical ones to his confidantes upon his return to England. Propelled by a lifelong curiosity over the "blank" spaces of the Congo, Marlow

Similar Essays

The Nature And Importance Of Truth

1090 words - 4 pages What exactly is truth? What is true? These questions are two completely different questions. In order to answer what is true, you must first determine what truth actually is. If we look in the Merriam-Webster dictionary, we see the definition that says “The things that are true”. This is not what we are looking for in a definition of this word, but really there is no defining line between what is true, and what is not. Truth is essentially

Greek And Christian Models Of The Truth

2383 words - 10 pages Greek and Christian Models of the Truth In his Philosophical Fragments, Søren Kierkegaard, writing under the pseudonym of Johannes Climacus, poses the question, "How far does the Truth admit of being learned?" (154). A more direct and succinct formulation of Climacus' question is "How is the Truth learned?" since his question does not concern the extent of human knowledge, which "How far" implies, but the possible modes through which one

The Roles Of The Husband And Wife

534 words - 2 pages still her name before marriage. In fact, marriage adds to the duties of the woman because the married woman gets new roles after marriage, i. e., being a wife and a mother. The question that is ignored by some people is this: if a married woman is a wife, a mother, and a housewife, why should the woman seek jobs outside her house and leave some of these new roles to other women employed as housekeepers or maids? After marriage, the woman becomes a

The Roles Of Greek And Roman Women

1679 words - 7 pages Greek and Roman women lived in a world where strict gender roles were given; where each person was judged in terms of compliance with gender-specific standards of conduct. Generally, men were placed above women in terms of independence, control and overall freedom. Whereas men lived in the world at large, active in public life and free to come and go as they willed, women's lives were sheltered. Most women were assigned the role of a