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The Roman Catholic View Of Marriage

1800 words - 7 pages

The Roman Catholic View of Marriage

People decide to get married to each other for many different reasons,
but many of them evolve around love and that they want to spend the
rest of their lives together forever.

Marriage is one of seven sacraments available for a Catholic to take.
These sacraments show a person commitment and love to the Church and
to God, it shows that they are a 'Whole' Catholic, if you know what I
mean.

Most of these sacraments take place during a mass, whilst celebrating
God.

The Marriage ceremony can be divided into different areas, to be
specific there are eight main areas and these are:

* The greeting

* The Sermon (Homily)

* The Marriage Ceremony

* The Marriage Vows

* Acceptance of Consent and the Blessing

* Exchanging of the Rings

* The Marriage Nuptial (Blessing)

* The signing of the Marriage Blessing

Before the Mass has even begun the priest welcomes the bride and
bridegroom and wishes them the best of luck. The Priest says this on
behalf of the congregation, this symbolises that the congregation are
with the bride and bridegroom and letting them know that they are
there to share the joy of the happy occasion. The congregation are
there, as is the priest, as witnesses to this sacrament.

During the Sermon the Priest will usually talk about what is meant by
a Christian wedding, he will mention the dignity of being married and
loved. He will also mention the responsibilities of marriage showing
that the couple are growing closer to God by loving each other.

This Sermon represents the responsibilities that a couple will have to
undertake during their marriage. It just brings back to mind all of
the things that the bride and bridegroom have been preparing for. It
is saying that Marriage isn't something that you should go into light
heartedly and reminds the bride and groom of the seriousness of the
decision they are about to be make.

The next part of the mass is the most important part, the ceremony
itself. The priest will ask the couple three simple questions to which
they will reply honestly. The Priest asks:

1. "Have you come to give yourselves to each other, freely and
without reservation?

In simple terms what the priest is asking is 'Are you already
married?' or `Are you being forced into marriage?' This question
represents freedom of life and you should not be forced into
something.

2. "Will you love and honour each other for life?"

This question sounds exactly as it is put. It represents the
exclusiveness of marriage i.e. one person and also that marriage is
for life not something you can discard ten or twenty years down the
line.

Christians believe very strongly about the fidelity of marriage, they
believe it is a sign of faithfulness and exclusiveness. This is why...

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