The Romanow Report

1133 words - 5 pages

Introduction
Primary health care is the essential step to the Canadian health system. It is often associated with other specialized health care sectors, and community services. Many patients visit various services under primary health care such as family doctors' office, mental health facilities, nurse practitioners' offices; phone calls to health information lines, for example, Tele-health; and suggestions received from physicians and pharmacist (Primary health care, n.d.). This service can prevent patients from visiting the emergency department, when all that is required is some guidance and advice. Having primary care services can reduce the consumption of acute beds, where only seriously ill patients can use the acute beds when it is available. Primary care not only deals with sickness care, but it helps patients receive preventable measures; it promotes healthy choices (Primary health care, n.d.). This paper will look at the litigious heated argument in the Romanow Report concerning primary care. It will begin with a discussion of the outcome of the Accord on Health Care Renewal (2003) and The First Ministers' Meeting on the Future of Health in Canada (2004), both referring to primary care, which will then be followed with an assessment and analysis of the different ways in which the accords have been addressed in support of primary care. The essay will conclude with a summary of the main points discussed.
Romanow Report: Primary Care
In 2002, November 28th, Roy Romanow created a report on the future of health care in Canada on ways of fixing the Canadian health care system. He outlined 47 critical recommendations, which covered 10 key areas. Romanow commends the five principles of the Universal Public Medicare. These are accessibility, public administration, universality, comprehensiveness and portability (Makarenko,2007). To guarantee that the five principles are met, and the issues of the health care system is fixed, he recommends a diverse range of issues pertaining to the health care system, from government financing and coordination to its primary legislative framework, to rural and aboriginal health, to health statistics and research (Local 229 express, 2002). According to Roy Romanow, primary care is a principle, not just a group of services. In the Romanow Commission Report, he failed to generate any recommendations of any territories of primary care as public health and as family practice. The only effort Romanow made was a statement where he said that, across the health care system, the principal change is primary care. It has been said in the CMAJ that Canada's primary health care needs a revision. In the Royal Commission Report, Romanow believes that the absolute model for primary care has been prevented (CMAJ, 2001). The Commission made some key recommendations. These include Primary Healthcare Transfer, National Platform, Prevention and marketing initiatives, and National immunization strategy (Makarenko, 2007).
Primary...

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