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The Science Of Crying Essay

705 words - 3 pages

The science of crying has extremely released itself from a state of a unique phantasma. This
facial phenomenon is a physical response to your emotional turmoil. There must be biological advantages or physical purposes to this lacrimating event. The knowledge of crying is quite vague but still much is known for this captivating occurrence.Humans cry for dissimilar reasons and purposes. When we cry, a fluid full of protein, water , and mucus is released from the lacrimal gland in the upper region of your eye. This fluid , or better known as, tears, flows down the surface of your face and as a by product, smearing your mascara. There are three different types of tears, reflex, basal , and emotional. Each tear has its own purpose and reason. (Fenske)

Reflex tears protect the eye from irritants such as smoke, dust, or onions. The sensory nerves in your cornea communicates this irritant to your brain stem. This stem , sends hormones to the glands in the eyelids. These hormones cause the eye to produce tears, ridding the irritation away. Basal tears are omnipresent in the eyes. These tears, are what keeps our eyes from completely drying out. With dry eyes, we would potentially and most likely become blind. “These tears drain through the nasal cavity which is the reason so many people have a runny nose after a good sob fest.” ( Hoyt ) Emotional tears derive in the cerebrum where sadness is registered.The Endocrine system is then activated to release hormones to the ocular region, which then causes tears to form (Fenske). These tears are able to act as a signal to others of our sadness or distress. This isn’t always easy to conceal. Your tears blur your vision, handicapping any aggressive or defensive actions sending those nearby a signal of need appeasement or attachment. “This increases communication and interactions with those close to you, and potentially your chance of survival.” ( Moffit )

What about tears of joy?--Tears of happiness may still be used as social signals for how we feel , and strengthen bonds between people (Moffit). Both emotions, distress and joy, have activity in close...

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