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The Scottsboro Trials Of The 1930´S

779 words - 4 pages

On March 25, 1931, nine men hopped on to a freight train. Little did they know the events that would ensue. Unjust and racist, the Scottsboro Trials were not just ordinary cases. The Scottsboro Trials changed how America viewed segregation. The nine young men, who hopped onto that train that day, were innocent and harmless. The Scottsboro Trials revealed the unjust treatment that African Americans faced and changed views on segregation.
In the 1930’s segregation was strongly enforced and whites were superior to blacks. So when white girls accuse blacks of raping them, the white girls are usually believed. The Scottsboro trials were meant to only take a few days, and it turned into months, ...view middle of the document...

When the nine Negro boys arrived at the Scottsboro county jail, the sheriff wanted to make it well known (Carter 7). The rumors grew more exaggerated and by the time the whole town heard, it was far from the real story.
Almost immediately after they were arrested, the trials began. All nine of they boys faced the jury. At the end of the third day of the trials, the judge gave the eight boys their sentence (Carter 42). Every one of them was sentenced to death, besides Roy, who was 13 at the time and the jury could not agree on a verdict (Carter 48). In 1933, the Communist Party hired a lawyer for Patterson. During this trial, Ruby Bates dropped her rape testimony, but the jury still sentenced him to death. Since the judge did not agree with this sentence he ordered another trial to take place in December 1933. Through many years, there were many different trials faced by the boys and most of them ended up with a death sentence or 75+ years of prison.
People’s reaction to the trials has changed drastically over the years. During the trails people would yell rude, disrespectful words at the Scottsboro boys (Carter 22). People in the North believed the...

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