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The Search For Acceptance In Kite Runner

936 words - 4 pages

Martin Luther King Jr. once said, “Discrimination is a hellhound that gnaws at Negroes in every waking moment of their lives to remind them that the lie of their inferiority is accepted as truth in the society dominating them.” No matter what context it is in, discrimination belittles people. Accompanying that, people search for some type of validation that they are better than what they’re perceived to be. Discrimination in the narrative Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini portrays this greater theme of searching for validation. It comes in all forms. Amir looks for validation from his father and in Hassan, while Hassan looks for validation in Amir. This constant need to be accepted is directly ...view middle of the document...

And you know how he always worried about you in those days. I remember he said to me, ‘Rahim, a boy who won’t stand up for himself becomes a man who can’t stand up to anything.’ I wonder, is that what you’ve become?’” (Hosseini 221). Since Baba pressured Amir so, he caused him to betray Hassan, Amir spends the rest of the book searching for acceptance from him. He tries to make up for the wrongs he committed towards him. Although he lost his chance for gaining that acceptance from Hassan himself since Hassan had passed away before Amir realized he must redeem himself, he does find the acceptance in saving and raising Hassan’s son, Sohrab. The moment of realization occurred when Amir was visiting Rahim Kahn in Peshawar. Luckily, when Rahim Kahn reminds Amir of the “boy who can’t stand up for himself”, Amir realizes he must go and redeem himself with Hassan by saving Sohrab.
Some of the reason Amir felt like Hassan was a “lamb I had to slay” was because of the way society portrayed Hazaras and what they did to belittle them. “Hassan didn’t struggle. Didn’t even whimper. He moved his head slightly and I caught a glimpse of his face. Saw the ignation in it. It was a look I had never seen before. It was the look of a lamb” (Hosseini 76).The raping of Hassan was a sole act of demeaning towards Hazaras. “’A loyal Hazara. Loyal as a dog,’ Assef said” (Hosseini 72). Hassan was able to overcome the horrible things that were happening to him so that he could stay loyal to Amir and get the acceptance of friendship he wanted from him. Hassan just wants to have a...

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