This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

The Significance Of Staging In Ibsen's 'a Doll's House' Literature Class Essay

930 words - 4 pages

Through its staging, ‘A Doll’s House’ gives powerful physical expression to the Victorian concept of ‘separate spheres’ for men and women and to the relative power of each gender. The Helmers inhabit different social domains and the degree of control each exercises within their respective territories differs markedly.
Nora’s province is exclusively domestic. Though she does not rule her home, she is shown residing almost entirely within it. She acts out her life onstage within the confines of the Helmer living room, described in the opening set directions as a comfortable space, but also, it seems an oppressively crowded one. A piano, a round table, a side table, a small sofa, easy chairs, two arm chairs, a rocking chair, a stove, a china cabinet and a small bookcase congest its limited confines. The setting is symbolic of the narrow dimensions within which Nora lives and the jostling constraints that press upon her with increasing force as the play progresses.
Torvald, on the other hand, has a significant life off-stage. This is suggested by his study and its multiple functions, indicating the extent to which Torvald’s life is different to his wife’s. Torvald’s study is a place of retreat. It is a private sanctuary to which he can withdraw at will and from which he has to be drawn forth by the enticements of his wife. It seems likely that Nora deliberately inveigles the parsimonious Torvald out with her apparently casual reference to all the Christmas gifts she has ‘bought’ so cheaply. Torvald has the power to decide when he will make himself available to Nora, an option she does not exercise so easily. Torvald is prone to remind her of her wifely obligations to him, including that of making herself intimately available to him. It is so inconceivable to him that Nora might deny his sexual demands that, when in Act 3 she appears to do so, his response is incredulous. ‘Ah, I see you’re teasing me, little Nora! Won’t — won’t! Am I not your husband?’ Similarly, he recalls with petulant irritation the period the year before when she had supposedly ‘shut [her]self up every evening till long past midnight to make flowers for the Christmas-tree’.
Torvald’s study is also connected to his function in the outside world. He makes arrangements regarding staffing at the bank from within this study. Krogstad visits him in his study (which appears to have at least one other entrance) and his friend, Dr Rank, is regularly invited into this private sanctum. It is a territory which is entirely Torvald’s, in the sense that he has absolute discretion as to whom he will grant access to it. His wife and children are never shown entering it. It seems to be an exclusively male preserve - a small...

Find Another Essay On The Significance of Staging in Ibsen's 'A Doll's House' - Literature class - Essay

A Doll's House And Staging Essay

403 words - 2 pages A Doll's House Scene Assignments Since this play is more psychological in its actions and themes, you are going to need to really work on eye contact and facial expressions to show what the characters are going through. Watching two groups perform the same scene will help you compare them and improve your own presentation abilities. Remember that you all will need to be the writer for the group twice so if you have not done it

Essay on Henry Ibsen's "A Doll's House"

771 words - 3 pages In 19th Century Denmark, the Danish were undergoing a struggle to define who they actually were, as conservatives opposed the reform-minded liberals. Ibsen implies the importance of social acceptability throughout this play, touching upon several different factors of Danish society, as this text will explain. "A Doll's House" grants that the status of women in 19th century Denmark; their roles weren't dominant, households were patriarchal, the

An Analysis of Irony in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

765 words - 3 pages In Henrik Ibsen's play A Doll's House, Torvald and his wife, Nora, live a middle class, conservative life with three children. Nora stays at home while Torvald works as a manager at a bank. Previously, when Torvald was sick, Nora forged her father's signature on a bond to receive money for a trip to Italy so Torvald could recover. Only Nils Krogstad, another man at the bank, and Nora's best friend, Linde, know about her terrible secret. Linde

Nora's Discovery of Self in Ibsen's A Doll's House

1422 words - 6 pages Nora's Discovery of Self in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House       Ibsen's play, "A Doll House," involves a woman who begins the play as a common housewife and through a series of joyous occurrences and catastrophes becomes a self-liberating woman.  Nora Helmer is transformed and decides to abandon her family and home in search of her true self.  She arrives at this point because of several factors.  Her refusal to submit to her husband and

Price of Freedom in Ibsen's A Doll's House

1342 words - 5 pages The Price of Freedom in A Doll's House    Freedom is something that people in all times, places, and experiences have sought after, often against great odds and at a great personal cost. But, in the struggle for freedom, every person gains a sense of true self, if they believe that the freedom which they are fighting for is just. In almost all plays, every character has something threatened which is important to them and which they

The Heroic Nora Helmer in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

2683 words - 11 pages The Heroic Nora Helmer in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House   What does it mean to be a hero?  According to Webster, a hero is someone "of great strength [and] courage" who is "admired" for his or her "courage and nobility."1  Stretching this definition a bit further, I would argue that a hero is someone who uses this strength, courage, and nobility to help or save others.  Nora Helmer, in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House, leaves her husband

Portrayal Of Sexism In Ibsen's The Doll's House

1440 words - 6 pages macaroons and must do so on the sly—which she clearly resents. Additionally, when Torvald addresses Nora, he belittles her by constantly bringing up her lack of responsibility with money. Depending on the translation, Nora is “spendthrift,” “prodigal,” and “little moneybags.” All of these terms, spoken affectionately, are passively aggressive. A Doll's House has few stage directions indicating tone of voice, so there is a great deal of freedom in

Henrik Ibsen's "A Doll's House"

2009 words - 8 pages A close study of the techniques used to portray the characters of Ibsen's A Doll's House has led me to key insights in regard to the relationship between the individual and society in 19th century Europe. Society at this time was extremely patriarchal, where men were the leading figures in the community and household. Income, status and hence reputation were far more important than anything else to the majority. Women and wives were a distant

Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

954 words - 4 pages Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House Ibsens's play is a modern tragedy which functions on two levels, questioning the established social order of the day and presenting the death of a marriage. Both these events create a great deal of tension, and combined with the language and actions used by the characters, make the play very intense. The main cause of dramatic tension throughout the play is the way that the difference between the real

Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

1283 words - 5 pages submission in society, legal assessment by male authority and state of social oppression. A Doll's House had a moral standing that initiated a feud between the different parties (genders) in the novel. The male characters in the book, specifically John, played a major role in influencing the behavior and actions of the female characters. Such a role placed the storyline of the novel in negative air. A Doll's House illustrates the evolving

Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

1248 words - 5 pages Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House Plot and Sub-plots The play begins on Christmas Eve of the late 19th century, in the living room of a middle class family, the Helmers. Nora is the female lead role in this play who is treated very child-like by her husband, Torvald. He appears to have taken over her father’s role which in turn allows their marriage to be built on unstable foundations and although both parties have each other’s best

Similar Essays

The Lie In Ibsen's A Doll's House

1852 words - 7 pages .   Secrets are a major portion in Ibsen's play A Doll's House.  He demonstrates how they are used in order to protect or help someone and the fact that they are usually brought to the surface sooner or later.  The surface of Nora's secrets resulted in her freedom.  The motivation behind the secrets in the beginning was to protect Torvald.  Ironically, when they were revealed, Nora was slapped in the face with reality.  The very thing she was

The Awakening Of Nora In Ibsen's A Doll's House

1071 words - 4 pages The Awakening of Nora in Ibsen's A Doll's House    The status of women in the 1800's, when A Doll's House was written, was that of a second-class citizen.  Women did not have the right to vote, own property, or make legal transactions.  The role of women was restricted to that of a housewife.          In A Doll's House, Ibsen does a wonderful job of presenting the character of Nora as person who goes though an awakening about her

The Rebellion Of Nora In Ibsen's A Doll's House

1371 words - 5 pages circumstances suddenly place Nora in a responsible position, and demand from her a moral judgment, she has none to give. She cannot possibly comprehend the severity of her decision to borrow money illegally. Their supposed inferiority has created a class of ignorant women who cannot take action let alone accept the consequences of their actions.             "A Doll's House" is also a prediction of change from this subordinate roll. According

The Role Of Realism In Ibsen's, A Doll's House

724 words - 3 pages Is “A Doll’s House” simply another text in which the composer questions the ideals of his society? Or is it advocating the rights of women as individuals, perhaps a pioneer in feminist literature? One may argue that “A Doll’s House” is nothing more than a product of Henrik Ibsen’s examination of his contemporary society’s values and morals, specifically those of the bourgeois class. But Ibsen does more than simply reflect upon these values and