The Silver Chair By C.S. Lewis

552 words - 2 pages

The Silver Chair by C.S. Lewis is a very unique book. The way I found it to be unique is that the majority of people who have read this book have just seen it as another book in the Chronicles of Narnia series, but in some peoples eyes it's a book about God. Some people see it as a book about God because of the actions of certain characters and the reaction to certain things that happen to the characters.On another note The Silver Chair is a very interesting book about Jill Pole and Eustace Scrubb. Both of the children, Jill Pole and Eustace Scrubb, attend the school called Experiment House. Experiment House is not your average boarding school, in Experiment House they do not believe in God and want nothing to do with him in their school; therefore the children are taught that God is not real. Pole and Scrubb are sent on a mission by Aslan, a magical talking lion from the land of Narnia, to find Prince Rilian, the son of Caspian. Scrubb and Pole are sent on this mission because Caspian has set out in the seas for his last voyage to find his son before his dies of his failing health.After the children have been briefed by Aslan they are blown into the land of Narnia. When they first arrive they are told to find an old friend, but before they realize it their old friend has left for the voyage with Caspian. So the children bathe in the castle of Caspian and before they know it they are escaping on a giant owl to start their...

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