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The Souls Of Black Folk By W.E.B. Du Bois

1472 words - 6 pages

In W.E.B. DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk, DuBois talks about the relationship between black people and white people. DuBois through his book is trying to explain all of the obstacles black people have to go through due to racial issues. He says how a black person is made two of everything, even though they are just one normal human being and the only difference is their color. “One ever feels his two-ness,—an American, a Negro; two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body, whose dogged strength alone keeps it from being torn asunder” (DuBois, 38). In this essay we are going look at how a black person is treated differently than a white person and that no matter how much that black person tries to make something of themselves, it still gets taken away unfairly.
Black people were seen as a problem by the white people just because their skin color was different;
How does it feel to be a
Problem? They say, I know an excellent colored man in my town; or, I
fought at Mechanicsville; or, Do not these Southern outrages make your
blood boil? At these I smile, or am interested, or reduce the boiling to a
simmer, as the occasion may require. To the real question, How does it
feel to be a problem? I answer seldom a word. (DuBois, 37)
All black people wanted was respect and human rights during their life, but the white people somehow had power over them and decided that they were a problem and wouldn’t give them any of those. The white people would make fun of the black people in front of their faces, telling them how another black person was beat up and how all the black people are a problem for the white people. How would you feel if someone told you that you were a problem? This would really upset a black person that would choose to speak up for themselves and end up getting beaten up for it.
A black person, no matter how much they just wanted to be allowed to be their self, they were not allowed due to the white people not allowing them to.
One ever feels his two-ness,—an American,
a Negro; two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two war-
ring ideals in one dark body, whose dogged strength alone keeps it from
being torn asunder (DuBois, 38)
The reason why they would have two of everything even though they only were one
person was due to the way the white people would categorize them. A black person was not given the rights the white person was given, they were looked down upon for it. A black people would have a view for themselves, whereas the white people would have a different view for them and this is why a black person always felt like they were two of everything. All the black people wanted to do was be given a chance to be able to prove themselves to the white people but it was hard because the white people didn’t want to bother with them.
John was just another black person who was a hard worker but his mother hoped to get more out of him. “But they shook their heads when...

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